Simon Shaw – Wasps and England

first_imgTom Rees Joe Worsley “It’s fantastic. For a while it was suggested that there were no up-and-coming second-rows and now we’ve got a whole crop of them, which is great for the game. They’re quality players and they showed throughout the summer tour that they’re ready for the big stage. They just need to continue the way they’re playing. “There’s a lot of competition and hopefully it’ll bring out the best in each of us. I’m just as keen despite the years. I was disappointed not to start the second Test in Australia, but I learnt early on never to count my chickens. Courtney got his chance and played exceptionally well. I have to accept that, keep fighting on and show the coaches I’m still capable.”Well, as far as Johnson is concerned his former boiler-room buddy is still more than capable. He says: “Shawsy just rolls on and is one hell of an athlete. He wants the chance to go the World Cup in 2011. As long as he thinks he can do it and we think he can do it, he’ll be there.”Learn more about Simon’s teammates at Wasps…Andy Powell Wasps and England Lock Simon ShawAs another milestone approaches for the Wasps lock, Rugby World finds out what keeps him smiling.Tell Simon Shaw that he will become the oldest person to play for England in a World Cup if he makes Martin Johnson’s squad for New Zealand 2011 – he will be 38 when the event kicks off, beating Paul Rendall’s appearance as a 37-year-old in 1991 – and he sighs. “I thought it might be the case but it’s not the sort of thing to brag about too much,” he says.It’s easy to see why the veteran second-row wants to play down the ‘achievement’. The abuse he gets for his age is “relentless” and even on the day of our conversation he had been the victim of yet another prank: a newspaper article featuring a picture of an England lineout from the 1940s pinned to the locker-room wall at London Wasps, with his name scribbled underneath to suggest he’d played in that game. “It was Joe Ward without a doubt,” says Shaw. “He likes to think he’s a comedian, but he should do something more subtle.”It’s now 14 years since Shaw made his Test debut as a 23-year-old against Italy at Twickenham, lining up alongside Johnson in the second row. Johnson is now England manager while Shaw continues to toil away on the pitch week in, week out. Suggest that the reason he keeps playing is that it’s easier than staying at home to look after his four children – aged seven to nine months – and he offers a wry smile, but the real reason for his longevity his far simpler. “I just enjoy it,” he says. “There’s no secret recipe or reason. Some people say I’ve been unlucky with injuries but I think I’ve been extraordinarily lucky to remain relatively injury-free. If I keep enjoying the game it’s a no-brainer for me; I just love being able to run around and compete.”That last comment is telling. Shaw’s skills as a ball-carrier set him apart from many other locks, so the fact the game has speeded up this season under the new law directives has played into his hands. He’s quick to point out that he has had to adapt to many changes in the game over the years (he was playing when the points awarded for a try went up from four to five!), but does admit he enjoys attacking with the ball. “I wouldn’t say I’ve lost any pace because I didn’t have any pace to begin with,” he jokes. “When I took up the game I didn’t fit into the mould of being a second-row who won lineout ball and pushed in scrums. I thought that was a bit boring. The thing I’ve always enjoyed most is running with the ball in my hands. The law changes this year have only emphasised to everyone the need to be more positive and play a good style of rugby, open and entertaining.”That’s certainly what New Zealand, Australia and, albeit belatedly, South Africa did during the Tri-Nations, so Shaw knows how big a task England faced with back-to-back Tests against the big three and Samoa during the last Autumn internationals. “I’m not a big fan of watching too much rugby – I do enough of that as it is. But I do know that New Zealand were outstanding and have taken the game to a new level, that Australia grew during the tournament and are getting back to where they used to be, and that South Africa are incredibly tough opposition. You always get a physical battle with Samoa, too, and to come off two Tests against two of the best sides in the world and feel the brutality of Samoa is a tough task.“High-pressure games like the Heineken Cup set you up well for the Internationals. Last year was pretty depressing as Wasps weren’t involved so it’s great to be back playing at the top level. I love it. Each win is so vital and both sides are giving their all so you can’t look beyond that game, then you have to back it up again the next weekend. That’s what it’s going to be like for the next few weeks with the level of opposition we have.” It’s not just England’s opponents that Shaw has to be worried about either; he also faces plenty of competition just to be picked in the starting XV. Courtney Lawes and Tom Palmer got the nod for the win over Australia in June while Dave Attwood is another youngster impressing. Shaw isn’t intimidated, however; quite the opposite. TAGS: Wasps LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Scotland v New Zealand: The Preview

first_img Can he kick it? Greig Laidlaw will need to be in top form if Scotland are to have any chance of beating New ZealandBy Katie Field, Rugby World writerSCOTLAND BEGIN their programme of EMC Internationals looking for a fourth win in succession, after a clean sweep on their summer tour of Australia, Samoa and Fiji. Their opponents are in a different position, aiming to start a new run of victories after their run of 16 consecutive wins was halted by their 18-18 draw with Australia last month. However, that’s not to say Scotland go into the match as favourites, because they are up against New Zealand, who have won the World Cup and the Rugby Championship in the past 13 months and who have never lost to Scotland.Singing the BluesScotland have played New Zealand 28 times and have managed two draws, but no wins. Since their most recent tie, 25-25 in 1983, the Scots have conceded an average of around 40 points a game to the All Blacks, and with New Zealand unquestionably the strongest side in the world at the moment, it will be the shock of the century if Andy Robinson’s side can pull off a victory this time. They have home advantage – and Murrayfield is a 67,144-sell-out in a November Test for the first time since it was redeveloped in 1994 – but last time New Zealand came to Edinburgh, two years ago, they strolled to a 49-3 triumph.Ready to go: Richie Gray passed a fitness testCh…ch…changesBoth teams have a different look to their last outings. Scotland have made five changes, with Nick De Luca and Mike Blair coming in for the injured Joe Ansbro and Chris Cusiter, Jim Hamilton returning in the second row after missing the summer tour through suspension, Geoff Cross stepping into the front row in place of Euan Murray, who will not play on Sundays, and Kelly Brown coming back into the starting line-up ahead of Richie Vernon. Richie Gray passed a midweek fitness Test to take up his place in the second row.New Zealand are fielding a new centre pairing of Ben Smith and Tamati Ellison, who coach Steve Hansen wants to try out at Test level having seen them combine well for the Highlanders.  So there’s no Ma’a Nonu and Conrad Smith to contend with, but Scotland will still have to face up to Dan Carter, Richie McCall et al.Aaron Smith makes way for Piri Weepu at scrum-half and Julian Savea is named on the left wing in the place of Hosea Gear. The pack sees wholesale changes with Adam Thomson and Victor Vito coming into the back row, Luke Romano replacing Brodie Retallick at lock and Wyatt Crockett, Andrew Hore and Owen Franks forming a different front row, instead of Tony Woodcock, Keven Mealamu and Charlie Faumuina.On call: Adam Thomson in EdinburghStart Me UpIf Scotland are to have any hope of causing an upset, they have to start well. Allow the All Blacks to get onto the front foot, and that can only spell trouble. Scotland may miss Murray in the scrums, but they have terrific strength in depth in the second and back rows, as well as the dead-eye kicking of Greig Laidlaw to take any chance New Zealand offer up.Coach Andy Robinson is clear about what’s required. “We will really need to start well and keep the game simple,” he says. “New Zealand are the world champions and they perform the basic skills, well, under the highest pressure. We need to step up from the summer tour and be ready to go toe to toe in a physical contest, just as Australia did most recently against New Zealand in Brisbane.” Referee: Jerome Garces (France) NOT FOR FEATURED LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Lest We ForgetAs the match takes place on Armistice Day, a silence in memory of the war dead will be held before the game. Scotland lost more international players in the First World War than any other nation – 30 – while New Zealand lost 20.Prediction: The raft of changes Steve Hansen has made to his New Zealand side gives Scotland a glimmer of hope, but I expect the tourists to win by a margin of 15 or 20 points.SCOTLAND v NEW ZEALAND, Sunday 11 November, 2.30pm, Murrayfield, Live on BBC1SCOTLAND: Stuart Hogg; Sean Lamont, Nick De Luca, Matt Scott, Tim Visser; Greig Laidlaw, Mike Blair; Ryan Grant, Ross Ford, Geoff Cross, Richie Gray, Jim Hamilton, Alasdair Strokosch, Ross Rennie, Kelly Brown (captain).Replacements: Scott Lawson, Allan Jacobsen, Kyle Traynor, Alastair Kellock, David Denton, Henry Pyrgos, Ruaridh Jackson, Max Evans.NEW ZEALAND: Israel Dagg; Cory Jane, Ben Smith, Tamati Ellison, Julian Savea; Daniel Carter, Piri Weepu; Wyatt Crockett, Andrew Hore, Owen Franks, Luke Romano, Sam Whitelock, Adam Thomson, Richie McCaw (captain), Victor Vito.Replacements: Dane Coles, Tony Woodcock, Ben Franks, Ali Williams, Sam Cane, Tawera Kerr-Barlow, Beauden Barrett, Ma’a Nonu.last_img read more

Pro Rugby in America readies itself for lift-off

first_img Full house: A Test between the All Blacks and USA was a sell-out This weekend will see the kick-off of professional rugby in America and RW speaks to the man tasked with exposing it to a potential audience of 330 million By Graham Jenkins“Professional rugby has officially arrived in America.”It is an audacious claim to make before a tackle has been made in the inaugural battle for the PRO Rugby title but the man behind the first competition to be sanctioned by USA Rugby and World Rugby is used to making bold and successful calls.Doug Schoninger made his name and his fortune in finance and banking before deciding the United States was finally ready to embrace rugby union on a grand scale and so convinced is he that he is prepared to prove it using his own money.The New Yorker has bankrolled the entire operation including the setting up of teams in Denver, Ohio, Sacramento, San Diego and San Francisco and the recruitment of the playing roster that includes ex-All Black centurion Mils Muliaina and former Springbok Pedrie Wannenburg.Star dust: All Black Test centurion Mils Muliaina will play in the new league“What really attracts me is that this is the last global sport not to go professional in the United States,” he explained, “it doesn’t mean it is going to work but there are not a whole lot of others to play with.“My job now is to expose 330 million people to this game, if they don’t like it then I was wrong.”To help convince the sports-mad population, including fans old and new as well as potential sponsors that rugby has indeed arrived, the league is prepared to shake things up a little.“We’re going to play sudden death so we are always going to have a result,” explained director of rugby operations Steve Lewis. “We’ve also told the refs we want high ball in play stats, we want speed and, without being artificial, we want points.”That determination to present an attractive product extends to often troublesome elements of the sport. “What’s the blight in the modern game? Scrum resets,” continued Lewis. “So I have expressed to the refs and coaches that we are having no more than two resets at which point the ref makes a decision.Growth sport: USA Sevens are expected to be challenging for medals in Rio“They may get it right, they might get it wrong, but the ball will be back in play. Short-arm, nobody gets three points, nobody gets 40 yards with a kick, but the ball is back in play.“We have also had meetings with the coaches where the message has been that you don’t get to year two without year one so this year we have to be more collaborative than competitors and that is difficult as every fibre of their bodies is competitive.“Short of not hiring defensive coaches there’s not much more we can do.“You have got to suck it up sometimes and realise that the whole thing has got to work and it’s not just about winning the league. It’s no good if there is no league in the second year.”They are also breaking new ground off the field. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The team names may appear a little bland to those US sports fans used to cheering on the ‘Warriors’, ‘Royals’ or ‘Broncos’ but there is a reason for that and it is part of the plan to build a dependable fan base with millennials a key target demographic.New frontiers: Ex-Wasps back Dom Waldouck will join Ohio for the season“We want to give ownership of that to the initial supporters, the foundation supporters of rugby,” explained Schoninger. “We’ll then pick one, build the logo around it and proper uniforms in the second year.“But the trick is if you want ownership it comes with responsibility, I’m giving you ownership but only as much as you take on responsibility.“So when people ask me what can  do I say go to games, buy a bit of the kit, if you don’t live anywhere near watch them on TV and watch them with people who don’t necessarily know rugby, spread the word – that’s what you can do, it doesn’t cost you anything.”The innovation does not stop there.The league announced this week that rather than the traditional TV broadcast right deal, games will be streamed worldwide via AOL.com and will also be available on cable through One World Sports.“The sports world is changing dramatically right now,” explained Schoninger, “so we are in the midst of that storm which is ultimately beneficial to us but short-term it is a negative.Time to go: San Francisco players get their promotional shots done“There are all these new distribution paths but I’m very much a digital guy and I think that’s what the presentation needs to be, I don’t think watching it on TV anymore is that interesting especially for people a lot younger than me.”But this isn’t just a money making exercise – the league’s mission is to fuel the development of the game in the country but to do that they are willing to use overseas talent.“The mandate of the league is to grow the American game, but that being said, sometimes you need to use the assets of people who are more developed than you,” insisted Schoninger.“I am 100% supportive of USA Rugby and I believe that they are 100% supportive of me, that’s kind of what you want, just like your spouse, you don’t want them to get involved too much.”But Schoninger is well aware it is not just a matter of paying players.“It was an amateur game, it is still an amateur game, we are bridging it to professionalism and it’s not something you just walk across to quickly,” he said. “It’s not just the players who are amateur, the structure is amateur, the participants are amateur, everything is amateur about it. Our job is not just to bring the players into professionalism but to bring everything into professionalism.”As a result he is not looking too far ahead. “You’ve got to make a start, it’s like a sales meeting you know, the goal of a first sales meeting is to get a second sales meeting, there is no other goal.”last_img read more

Joe Cokanasiga entertains as England crush Italy

first_imgHandling ability, creativity, vision. Delightful.— Murray Kinsella (@Murray_Kinsella) March 9, 2019England opened the scoring with Jamie George going over from a driving maul. Italy ten Tommaso Allan scored and converted his try to make it 14-14, but England were in control for the rest of the match. Cokanasiga was not the only one entertaining, with Manu Tuilagi getting a brace, Brad Shields dotting down twice, George Kruis charging down and scoring, Jonny May getting on the end of a score and Robson’s try mentioned above.Italy got one other try in the second half, through centre Luca Morisi.After the game, Eddie Jones talked about the impact of Tuilagi – praising Leicester for helping him get back to his best and joking that he’d taken the centre’s passport so he couldn’t head over to France to meet Racing 92, who he has been linked to recently.Tuilagi was at his bruising best against Italy. His first try was a 55m run-in after bursting past Angelo Esposito and Michele Campagnaro.His second was from him getting on the end of a long George pass. And he also created Shields’ first score with another break.It was a physical, hard-running performance from England. They are still in the running to win the Six Nations, but if they beat Scotland, they will also depend on the result from Wales versus Ireland next week, with the Welsh chasing a Grand Slam.Ominously, Jones said of the game next week against Scotland, who won the Calcutta Cup last season: “That (facing England) is their game of the year. Look at the way they carried on last year.“Some have short memories, some have long memories. I remember everything that they said last year.”He also had a small word of caution as others prepared to praise Cokanasiga. TRY! Cokanasiga unselfishly goes inside to Robson who has a clear run to the line pic.twitter.com/Z3tCngX2GI— ITV Rugby (@ITVRugby) March 9, 2019 Joe Cokanasiga entertains as England crush ItalyEngland routed Italy 57-14, scoring eight tries along the way to a hefty Six Nations victory. However, it was a man who did not make it onto the score sheet who had fans raving after the match.The 21-year-old wing Joe Cokanasiga was given man of the match after a swashbuckling display that saw him busting tackles while carrying the ball in one hand, stealing balls out the air and setting up a try for Dan Robson after burning around Federico Ruzza in the second half.He even did a headstand on the touchline after slipping the ball to Robson. Oh yeah, and he packed down at No 8 at one point. Stunning bit of skill from Joe Cokanasiga! One-handed wonder: Joe Cokanasiga (Getty Images) center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The 21-year-old wing was at his swashbuckling best as England scored eight tries. Asked about the unpredictable wing’s tendency to carry in one hand, the coach said after a short pause: “That stuffs great for you guys… but possibly he could carry in two hands at other times.”Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

2019 Rugby World Cup: Japan 28-21 Scotland

first_img Rugby World Cup Groups Expand Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Japan Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Scotland Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Here is everything you need to know about the day Japan went through to their first-ever World Cup quarter-final TAGS: Japan Rugby World Cup Groups 2019 Rugby World Cup: Japan 28-21 ScotlandHead-to-headPlayed – 8Japan wins – 1Scotland wins – 7Did You Know?This is the first time Japan have ever made it to the knockout stages of a World Cup.They will play South Africa in the quarter-finals next Sunday in Tokyo.Fly-half Yu Tamura is the top point-scorer in the 2019 World Cup so far, with 48.Scotland won all three of their previous World Cup match-ups against Japan in 1991, 2003 and 2015, scoring 17 tries and conceding just three.Greig Laidlaw was captain for a fifth time at a Rugby World Cup, matching the Scotland record for David Sole and Bryan Redpath.Scotland’s 34-0 win over Samoa and then 61-0 win over Russia made them the first side to win back-to-back RWC games without conceding a point. Overall they have nilled opposition on five occasions in World Cup history – a record.Related: Rugby World Cup FixturesIn a nutshellThe greatest day ever for Japanese rugby? It could well be the Rugby World Cup’s finest day ever, too.Japan are through to the quarter-finals for the first time in their history. Last time round they became the first side to win three games and not go through. Well, they won every single game in the pool this time, dispatching Russia, Ireland, Samoa and then demolishing the Scots. And playing mind-bending rugby too.So many words had been fired out before this match about whether it would be on. About the injustices of cancelling games. About relationships between unions. About how people felt about the World Cup.Well, after this game, new love affairs will have begun between viewers and this sport. Particularly in Asia.It all began at fever pitch.Physical force: Kotaro Matsushima is tackled by Scotland (Getty Images)Scotland could not take the kick-off but their defence began at its walloping best, with double tackles and Blade Thompson and Jamie Ritchie relishing the contact. We even got a rare glimpse of Jonny Gray pumping up the crowd.With such direct physicality, they were able to retain ball, work upfield and Finn Russell got the first score, taking the ball off nine, sliding slightly to the right and dragging two defenders over with him.But directness is not a trait of this Japanese team. In a flash Kotaro Matsushima became the joint leading try-scorer in this competition, getting his fifth of the tournament. Timothy Lafaele found himself on the wing and he fed Kenki Fukuoka, who let some lightning out of the bottle.As Chris Harris’s hit sent him falling, the wing pulled an offload out of the depths. Matsushima gratefully ate it up and went over.If that was blinding though, the next was even better.Matsushima was bouncing tacklers in Scottish territory. Then Shota Horie – who has been a dynamo all tournament – hammered through. He hit James Moore, who fed William Tupou, who bounded right and then threw up another cracker offload to loosehead Keita Inagaki, who fell over to score.There was a beautiful through kick for Fukuoka, who got Japan’s third. After the break he got the bonus-point score, too, a heartbreaker for optimistic Scots. And it was all individual brilliance. The wing caught Harris, stripped him of the ball, caught it as it spun in the air and then raced away for the try.Scotland came back, though, with WP Nel burrowing over. Then they upped their own tempo again. Russell was throwing balls to himself from a quick lineout. Offloads were sticking. Tackles were brushed off. Gray got the ball, passed to Scott Cummings, who gave it back to Gray, and a trundling Zander Fagerson went over. It was game on again after a Russell conversion. Yep, 28-21, with 20 to go.The pressure was on Scotland. They needed a fourth try and to finish eight points clear to deny Japan a place in the last eight. It got looser, possibly scarier for anyone with a vested interest in the outcome of this. But it was heart-pounding all the same. Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Scotland failed to reach the quarter-finals for only… Collapse And then it was about rearguard action from Japan. They were fierce. They saw it out. They made history.Related: Rugby World Cup TV CoverageStar manKenki Fukuoka was the embodiment of this game: lightning quick, resilient, perplexing. All he was missing was a week of talk solely about him.The wing – who is in the latest issue of Rugby World magazine – is likely became a household name tonight. His 2019 will go down in lore in Japan for sure. He is set to play sevens in the Olympics and then soon – all too soon – he will leave rugby. He has other plans. But boy, we’re happy he was here.The reactionScotland coach Gregor Townsend: “We are disappointed we weren’t able to win by more than eight points. We started really well but then we didn’t see much of the ball for the rest of the first half.“Part of that was down to what Japan were doing when they had the ball, but the two tries we conceded were soft, one from our possession and another from a re-start.“The players put a huge effort into that period after half-time and after 58 minutes we were only seven points behind. But we didn’t do enough in that last 20 minutes to get the win.”Japan coach Jamie Joseph: ”“Scotland were unbelievable. They took it to us from the start and scored. It was the tenacity I guess of our team at crucial parts of the test which helped. The fact we were playing at a home world cup – we can feel and see the level of support.“I think the word attack is often reflected in the way you get the ball back. We are an attacking team as well. There are two sides. Scotland really hit us there.“Persistence and confidence and trust the plan is what saw us through. In the last two or three minutes it was a test match we didn’t want to lose.”The SquadsJapan: William Tupou (Ryohei Yamanaka 50); Kotaro Matsushima, Timothy Lafaele, Ryoto Nakamura (Rikiya Matsuda 74), Kenki Fukuoka; Yu Tamura, Yutaka Nagare (Fumiaki Tanaka 50); Keita Inagaki (Isileli Nakajima 56), Shota Horie (Atsushi Sakate 72), Jiwon Koo (Asaeli Ai Valu 21), Luke Thompson, James Moore (Uwe Helu 51), Michael Leitch (captain, Hendrik Tui 74), Pieter Labuschagne, Kazuki Himeno.Tries: Matsushima 17, Inagaki 21, Fukuoka 39, 42. Cons: Tamura 18, 22, 40, 43.Scotland: Stuart Hogg; Tommy Seymour (Blair Kinghorn 51), Chris Harris, Sam Johnson, Darcy Graham (Pete Horne 60); Finn Russell, Greig Laidlaw (captain) (George Horne); Allan Dell (Gordon Reid 51), Fraser Brown (Stuart McInally 51), Willem Nel (Zander Fagerson 51), Grant Gilchrist (Scott Cummings 51), Jonny Gray, Magnus Bradbury (Ryan Wilson 65), Jamie Ritchie, Blade Thomson.Tries: Russell 6, Nel 49, Fagerson 54. Cons: Laidlaw 7, 50, Russell 55. Hosting their first World Cup, Japan made history… Expand A rundown of the Rugby World Cup groups… Scotland Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Japan Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guidelast_img read more

Five things we learnt about rugby in December

first_imgFrom wings to Wasps, Paul Williams casts his eye over rugby’s recent goings-on Dive time: Gloucester’s Louis Rees-Zammit scores against Worcester (Getty Images) Carr ride: Wasps celebrate as Nizaam Carr scores the winning try at Bristol (Getty Images)That was until their win over Bristol, in Bristol. It was a fantastic fixture and one of the games of the month. With Malakai Fekitoa rediscovering early career form and shredding the line like the 50-cap All Black he could have been, Wasps cut the Bears’ midfield to pieces – 100m carried, with three clean breaks and six defenders beaten are big numbers for a centre.Add to that Nizaam Carr’s stunning try, in which the usually immaculate Charles Piutau undid his previous defensive efforts, and Wasps delivered a victory that could be the difference between playing in the Premiership or the Championship next season.Is the Top 14 losing its sheen for Welsh players?The festive period saw confirmation that Rhys Webb will return to the Ospreys – a Christmas present that their supporters dearly needed. It is a significant move for Welsh rugby. Not only does it see one of Wales’ best players return to regional rugby, but it marks the reversing of a trend of Welsh players going to France’s Top 14.In truth, Webb has had a mixed time in Toulon. Injury, and Baptiste Serin, meant that Webb hasn’t had it all his own way, but he has become favourite of Toulon supporters.Coming home: Rhys Webb will leave Toulon for Ospreys at the end of the season (Getty Images)Webb isn’t alone in finding mixed fortunes in France; in fact, he is one of the positive examples. Other than Lee Byrne, Stephen Jones and Gareth Thomas, almost everyone else struggled to adapt in one way or another – even players as good as Gethin Jenkins, Jamie Roberts and Dan Lydiate would consider their trip to France as a ‘learning experience’.Perhaps the final nail in the coffin for Welsh players in France is the lack of Top 14 television coverage in the UK now. Thus, players who move to France become invisible to the Welsh public and selectors very quickly. Plenty of players will still choose to leave Wales, but the Top 14 is no longer the top destination.Exeter Chiefs grow in confidenceExeter Chiefs are a well-run club. Arguably the best in the world game. It has allowed them to grow organically from something local, to something global.With a recruitment policy that only acquires players with a robust work ethic, they’ve built a squad and culture that is the envy of most and places them as many supporters’ second favourite team. Yet for all their positives, they have often been overshadowed by the glitz of the London clubs.However, as we saw in December, that is changing as Exeter grow in confidence on and off the field. Their performance against Saracens over the festive period was massive and straight from page one of the Exeter playbook – tackle and carry until you puke. Rugby World’s February 2020 issue is themed around the future of rugby and comes with a free Six Nations magazine – out now. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. The rise of Louis Rees-Zammit‘Damn it, Zammit’ may not be the actual words used by the opposition’s back three, supporters and coaching staff, but they echo the sentiment expressed so far.The impact that Louis Rees-Zammit has had on the Gallagher Premiership would have been massive even if he was a 27-year-old, world conquering Fijian; to do it as an 18-year-old on a development contract is ludicrous. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS HOW?! Exeter Chiefs work wonders holding this up! A HUGE moment! For the first time in two years, Saracens are pointless at half-time… pic.twitter.com/TdMQ2kOoVc— Rugby on BT Sport (@btsportrugby) December 29, 2019The fixture was of course about more than just rugby. There was a back-room element to this game that spilt onto the pitch and sent us flying back to 1990s rugby, where festive derbies often saw players being hurled into the advertising hoardings.Rob Baxter’s post-match comments were as aggressive as his teams defensive-line and were a welcome sign for those who have stood fast on their criticism of salary cap breaches. Add to that the news that Jonny Gray may soon be joining them, a player who epitomises the Exeter way, and Chiefs are looking like Premiership leaders both on and off the field. With the bonus point wrapped up in the first half, @racing92 took their foot off the gas in the second 40 and @ospreys fought back But it wasn’t enough, and the French side took all points #HeinekenChampionsCup highlights pic.twitter.com/tsXoFqIXwi— Heineken Champions Cup (@ChampionsCup) December 14, 2019Chasing a four-try BP from the kick-off could have a big impact on not only tactics but selection. Why pick a defensively-focused back three when you can select finishers? All of a sudden, the defensively weak but offensively strong outside-half becomes the starting ten and the box-kicking nine is no longer the star of the show.Rugby changes quickly and we could well see this trend develop. Worth keeping an eye on.Wasps win bigWith Wasps looking like an insect that has somehow survived through to early winter, they needed a win. They looked set for the type of post-Christmas run-in that directors of rugby dread – the type that can get a bit ‘sacky’. Rees lightning @LouisReesZammit with the hat-trick try This lad is some player! pic.twitter.com/Rb54VLCCd8— Rugby on BT Sport (@btsportrugby) December 28, 2019With enough gas for Gloucester to consider mining him as an additional income stream, he has what all head coaches require from a wing – raw pace. Whilst the role of a modern wing has become far more kick-chase/defence-based in recent years, speed remains the primary function of a wing.Some may say that we’ve seen this all before in the Premiership. Players like Christian Wade had the legs, but maybe not the shoulders to succeed at the very top level, but that doesn’t seem to be the case with the Gloucester wing. He seems comfortable defensively and his positioning is promising for such a young player.Social media has been awash with English pundits and supporters trying to claim Rees-Zammit as their own. But as he has publicly declared, he is Welsh. Over to you, Mr Pivac.A new approach to away games in EuropeAway wins in Europe, especially the Champions Cup, are rare. They always have been. The reality is that a bonus point (BP) is the goal from the outset. But with rugby becoming ever more professional, and ruthless, we could see a new approach to away games in Europe.As we saw in December, some teams, the Ospreys being one, managed to get a four-try BP in a largely one-sided game. It begs the question, is there any point in approaching away games defensively, when outright attack from all areas can secure you four tries?last_img read more

Mission and evangelism: Getting out of the safety zone

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Mission and evangelism: Getting out of the safety zone Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cheryl Lewis says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH March 19, 2012 at 9:55 pm Fr. Tony:We are looking forward to your arrival in Glen Carbon, and St. Thomas. Safe travels. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Tony ClavierPosted Mar 19, 2012 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Doug Desper says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Servicecenter_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Evangelism John Bell says: Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA March 21, 2012 at 1:08 am This was beautifully written and at a time when this soul needed to know it. Thank you for sharing. Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET March 23, 2012 at 8:23 pm “The Faith is a matter of life and death. Redemption is a rescue mission, not merely to pluck souls for heaven, but to redeem the whole creation”. Thank-you, Fr. Clavier, for reminding us that we are THE CHURCH of JESUS CHRIST and that we have a Great Commission.This is the kernel of truth that, if practiced, will focus our Church towards growth. We don’t have an attendance problem. We don’t have a budget problem. We don’t have a newcomer problem. We have a heart problem. Revision of the faith for this culture and social engineering are all too evident as the main concern that occupies our beleagured Church – and the condemning results are glaring at us in our statistics over the last 50 years. We have a heart problem. If we re-gain Fr. Clavier’s passion and vision then we will become a reinvigorated Church, if that’s what we want. Does General Convention want that? We’ll see. Comments (3) Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service] Statistics are cold. Of course they can be and are manipulated to justify positions. Nevertheless there’s no disputing that the Episcopal Church is in systemic decline.  Seeking ways to reverse this loss of “membership,” resources and influence involves us all in the uncomfortable process of leaving our safety zones — no easy task for gray-heads, those of us who have become the major group of parishioners in the contemporary Episcopal Church.A reassessment of mission and vision requires learning anew the purpose of the church, why it exists, and the faith that it is called to proclaim. Renewal has to begin there. Our major task is to grasp once again the purpose of our parishes and missions, planted where they are in real communities, places where in worship and study we are prepared and enabled to be witnesses to that which God has done and is doing in Jesus through the Spirit. We learn painfully that the church where we are isn’t primarily a staging point from and by which we grasp life after death. Rather the church, our church, is the place, the visible place from which we engage the world in the wholeness of its need, spiritual and social.In short our local church isn’t a place to escape, a venue for self-preservation, in which our needs are addressed. Such a view is inherently selfish and it breeds the view that if we don’t get cared for we can always find some other place or no place except home where we can be the central factor. Consumerism is consumerism even of it is cloaked in piety. Clergy particularly have become the victims of people who think that a priest exists to make them content. Parishes are riven when those who want one thing collide with those who want another. It’s all selfish and destructive.In Baptism God has adopted us. Eternal life is God’s free gift. As long as we remain true to that “salvation” and live in God’s will, that’s a given. But — and it is a big “but” — that’s the start of discipleship and not its content. All of us, even the gray-heads, are able to work, give and pray for the Kingdom, as the old prayer book put it. And the kingdom isn’t our local church building, or our usual pew. Rather our church home is the kingdom’s local franchise, the place from which mission begins and continues. While we remain content to receive without giving, maintaining and surviving without engaging the communities in which we are in contact with the world God loves and the people God yearns to bring to himself, we will be merely denominationalists, and our love — self-love — will center on everything other than being the church.Clergy and laity have to learn anew. Ordinands will have to be formed and shaped in radically new but thoroughly old ways of leadership. Laity will have to be disturbed, challenged and trained. And perhaps we all need to become aware of evil, of the presence of that which opposes God’s rule “on earth as it is in heaven,” an evil that clothes itself in our culture in the idea that faith is personal and private, something that has no place in the market place. We have all tried so hard to fit in, to accept, to collaborate, to be nicely Anglican that we no longer see evil around us, or if we do, we judge those caught upon in its seduction while being equally seduced ourselves.The Faith is a matter of life and death. Redemption is a rescue mission, not merely to pluck souls for heaven, but to redeem the whole creation. True God is the author of that purpose. We are God’s messengers, God’s lovers, God’s voice of justice and mercy. Jesus told his followers that they would receive power — we get the word dynamite from that Greek word — to be his witnesses — life-givers — to the ends of the world. For most of us that world and its “ends” are discovered in the communities our parishes embrace.A simple way to begin is to make sure that the people and needs of the community in which we are placed, its families and lonely people, are intentionally remembered in the Prayers of the People at the Eucharist. That’s a very small and simple start, but our intentional prayers are powerful and they nudge us to witness and service. Instead of simply praying for “our church” and ourselves, perhaps we should leave that to others and pray instead for all who live and work and play around our churches and homes?  Such a good habit will enable us to hear the Gospel as it is read and preached, and spur us to renewed mission and vision.— The Rev. Tony Clavier retires in April from his present responsibilities as rector of Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church, La Porte, Indiana, and will go from there to care for two missions in the Diocese of Springfield. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

Canada: ‘Reach out to flood victims,’ urges Calgary bishop

first_img Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC By Marites N SisonPosted Jun 24, 2013 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest A portion of MacLeod Trail, a major road in downtown Calgary, under water during the worst flooding that Alberta has seen in decades. Photo: Resolute/Wikimedia Commons[Anglican Journal] Anglican Diocese of Calgary Bishop Greg Kerr-Wilson has urged members of his diocese to reach out to individuals and congregations who have been affected by the severe flooding in Southern Alberta.Three people have been killed and at least 100,000 have been displaced by the worst flooding the province has seen in decades, according to the RCMP. “I am certain you already have been praying, but I would encourage you to persevere in that prayer for all who have been affected; remembering particularly those who have died, and for strength for those who are working to manage this crisis, particularly our emergency workers and civic leaders,” said Kerr-Wilson, in a pastoral statement.  The statement was to be read in parishes across his diocese during services last Sunday.Kerr-Wilson noted that the massive flooding has resulted in the evacuation of tens of thousands of people, among them members of Anglican parishes.“As you will likely know from news reports, High River, Canmore, parts of Calgary and surrounding areas have been particularly affected, but others in various centers downriver are also affected and under threat,” he said.In an initial report to clergy and lay leaders in his diocese, Kerr-Wilson noted that the places immediately affected by the flood have been Banff, Canmore, Okotoks and High River, outside of the city of Calgary, and Cathedral Church of the Redeemer, Christ Church and St. Edmund’s Bowness, inside the city.“I know that many of our folks have been doing what they can to help; offering shelter for evacuees, providing food where needed, and volunteering time and energy to alleviate the impact of the crisis,” noted Kerr-Wilson.He urged the faithful to continue offering their help, saying that recovery and cleanup efforts would take weeks. “It will be a time of hardship, anxiety and frustration for many. It will be a time when many will need help, encouragement and support,” said Kerr-Wilson. “Together as a diocese we will need to determine what it is that we can be doing to take our part in giving flesh to our Christian call to love your neighbor.”The primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, has also issued a statement assuring Albertans of “the prayers of the church across Canada.” Hiltz urged Anglicas to remember those who have lost loved ones and also thoe who are providing support and counsel to victims.“I think as well of clergy who will be drawing communities together, praying for the waters to recede and for the success of recovery operations and the labors of city officials, public servants and town managers to restore the flooded areas,” said Hiltz. “Please know my heart pours out to one and all. May God give you strength to meet the days ahead and hope to see beyond them.” Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Canada: ‘Reach out to flood victims,’ urges Calgary bishop Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Church of England says ‘yes’ to women as bishops

first_img Press Release Service Bruce Garner says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA July 16, 2014 at 12:22 pm Historically, the Christian Church has spread teachings which have undermined the equality of women, despite Jesus’ own example of treating women with revolutionary respect and importance in his own ministry. The Catholic Church massacred the Cathars in medieval France. They taught not only the equality of men and women but also carried on the legends of Mary Magdalene escaping to France possibly as the wife of Jesus and mother of his child. The Catholic church for centuries has exterminated all those who questioned or opposed male centric teachings which may have been nothing but atrocious lies. We know for sure that women were teaching and speaking in the early house churches which is why Paul felt obliged to speak out against them. We have now discovered ancient Gospels from Thomas, Phillip, and Mary Magdalene which give a very different view of early Christianity than the Catholic church has designed by murdering and torturing heretics for thousands of years. Those Catholic crimes are many, and I pray that the Catholic church and its army of puppet soldiers repent of their crimes and lies before they face their maker. President Jimmy Carter told a recent conference celebrating civil rights at the LBJ Library at UT Austin, that there are now more slaves in America than there were before the Civil War. They are mostly women and children trapped in the sex trade. He lays the blame for this horror in part on the role the Christian church has played in promoting the inequality of women. He and his wife have left the conservative Baptist church because of their stand on women and he now worships in a liberal Baptist church with a woman pastor. I cannot understand how Christians who believe that there is a God of the universe can continue to commit crimes of persecution against those who disagree with them or against women to try to “show them their place.” I can only imagine that they are actually atheists who do not believe in an afterlife. The Church needs to follow Jesus, not world empires corrupted by criminals. It must lead the way in freeing women and children from modern slavery and promote equal respect for all people regardless of race, religion, sex, handicap, or age. Until it does these things, it has failed to follow Jesus’ commandments to love our neighbor and love our enemies. I pray every day for the soul of the Church, especially for those religious people who have devised sneaky ways to avoid criminal prosecution while abusing or murdering other people. I applaud the Episcopal Church on this step in the right direction, but it is not nearly enough to undo the damage that 2000 years of discrimination has caused, I pray it looks for all the many ways that it can heal the terrible prejudice against women that Christianity has perpetuated for centuries. Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group July 28, 2014 at 3:20 pm Just a correction and some additional information to Fr. Matthew’s above time line. Florence Li’s (Li Tim-Oi) historic ordination to the priesthood in early 1944, was a quiet and simple affair. The congregation was small but filled the little church in Zhaoqing (not Hong Kong which was then under Japanese occupation during WWII). Just one priest assisted Bishop Ronald Owen Hall. There were, or course, none of Florence Li’s family present. The congregation was, however, increased by the presence of the pastor and members of the local Chinese Holiness Church, members of the local institute for the blind, and the Baptist minister. It took Florence Li a horrendous four day journey to be “smuggled” from the then Portuguese colony of Macao, under Japanese occupation, to Zhaoqing, a prefecture-level city of Guangdong province, then under the control of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek’s government of the Republic of China. Ronald Owen Hall, was the Bishop of Victoria, Hong Kong since 1932, and then from 1951 of the smaller Diocese of Hong Kong and Macao until his retirement in 1966.After the war, when the news of the irregular ordination reached Archbishop William Temple of Canterbury and the Church of England, Florence Li put aside her priestly functions in order to save Bishop Hall the embarrassment of being defrocked as a bishop at the 1948 Lambeth Conference. She wrote to Bishop Hall in the following way, “I would like to keep quiet to help the church. You are an important man, I am a mere worm, a tiny little worm.” Florence Li was adamant that she never resigned her priestly order, rather she put her priestly functions aside in order to help maintain the status quo, until she arrived in Canada in the late seventies. In 1998, fifty years after the Lambeth Conference that thoroughly condemned Bishop Ronald Owen Hall’s unilateral action, saw the first women bishops ever to attend a Lambeth Conference. The “little worm” helped move a mountain. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 14, 2014 at 12:07 pm Hearty congratulations to Synod on voting to allow women to become Bishops. It is as though surgery has been performed to correct a non-functioning member in the body, so that now the body had the potential to function at full strength. In the words of Bishop Tutu: “Yippee!” An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Matthew DaviesPosted Jul 14, 2014 Javier Bronson says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Mike Lawlor says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Christopher Lo says: Members of the Church of England’s Synod attend the session during which they discussed and voted on the consecration of women bishops, in York, July 14. Photo: REUTERS/Nigel Roddis[Episcopal News Service] The Church of England made history July 14 when its General Synod, meeting in York, approved legislation to enable women to serve as bishops, possibly by 2015.The vote ends centuries of tradition and follows more than a decade of often-emotional debate accompanied by various stages of legislative action.Before the vote, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said to pass the legislation “is to commit ourselves to an adventure in faith and hope. Like all adventures it carries danger [and] uncertainties and for success requires perseverance, integrity and courage.”Welby said the legislation “allows us to move forward together, all of us as faithful Anglicans and all of us committed to each other flourishing in the life of the church … Today we can start on a challenging and adventurous journey to embrace a radical new way to be the church … Jesus invites us to radical belonging to one another so that all the world will know that we are his disciples.”One synod member read out a message from Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town Desmond Tutu. “I’m thrilled to hope that our mother church, the Church of England, will do the right thing today … to allow women to become bishops as we have in Swaziland and in Cape Town,” said Tutu. “Wow, you are in for a great surprise and treat should you do this. Your church will be enriched no end … Just look at what we have denied ourselves. God be praised. Yippee.”On hearing the news, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, the first female primate in the Anglican Communion, said: “I am overjoyed for the Church of England as it has finally consented to the ordination and consecration of women as bishops. I believe that the inclusion of women in this order will bring new gifts and possibilities for its partnership in God’s mission in England. This represents one more step in the long transformation of church and society toward the Reign of God.”The legislation, called a measure, affirms the church’s commitment to “enabling women, as well as men, to be consecrated to the office of bishop if they otherwise satisfy the requirements of Canon Law as to the persons who may be consecrated as bishops.”The vote comes almost 20 months after the synod narrowly rejected similar, but more complex, legislation to accept women as bishops. While passed by the bishops and clergy, that November 2012 vote failed in the House of Laity by six votes. Various groups, including a steering committee and the House of Bishops, have since worked towards advancing as efficiently as possible a legislative package that could be supported by the required two-thirds majority in all three houses of laity, clergy and bishops.The General Synod gave its assent to the new legislation when it last met in February. Since then, through an abbreviated process, a majority of the church’s 44 dioceses have given their assent to the legislation, a step required whenever synod is proposing a change to church and U.K. law.The legislation passed on July 14 with 37 votes for, 2 against and 1 abstention in the House of Bishops; 162 votes for, 25 against and 4 abstentions in the House of Clergy; and 152 votes for, 45 against and 5 abstentions in the House of Laity.The measure now requires approval by the U.K. Parliament and royal assent, because the legislation effectively changes English law. (The Church of England is an officially established Christian church with Queen Elizabeth II as its supreme governor.) Following the failure of the previous legislation, during parliamentary debate some U.K. politicians bemoaned the church’s decision and its drawn-out journey towards acceptance of women bishops. It is expected that the U.K. Parliament will take up the matter before the end of 2014, which would mean the first female bishop could be appointed in 2015.Meanwhile, an Amending Canon, which was passed by synod without debate, will change the gender-specific language in the church’s legal and formal documents.Some of synod’s former opponents of the legislation signaled their willingness to commit to the new legislative package, in part due to a declaration from the House of Bishops outlining procedures for handling grievances, mediation and resolving disputes arising from those who are unable to accept the new legislation or the ministry of women bishops.The declaration lists five guiding principles acknowledging that the Church of England has reached a clear decision on the matter; accepting that there will be those who disagree with the decision; and committing to maintaining the highest degree of communion through “pastoral and sacramental provision for the minority.”Back in February, Bishop James Langstaff of Rochester, who chaired the steering committee that produced the new legislative package, raised up the five principles as the linchpin of the declaration. “If we stick with those then we will find that we will behave with each other as we should,” he said.Before the July 11 debate, Langstaff said, “There are many eyes and ears that are attentive to what we do … The wider church, both Anglican Communion and ecumenical partners, also look on. While we may properly be aware of those others we are here today to do what we believe through God is right.”Langstaff said he believes that this is the moment to vote yes but that he fully recognizes and respects that there will be those who in good conscience cannot vote in favor. “The Church of England has spoken very clearly through the voting of our diocesan synods … We have a responsibility to be guided by what we assess to be the settled view” of the overwhelming majority in the church.”Theologian and scholar Paula Gooder, a lay synod member from the Diocese of Birmingham and also a member of the women bishop’s steering committee, urged synod to vote in favor of the legislation, but warned that changing law can only do so much. “Trust and flourishing are down to us…and that can only happen through how we live our own lives,” she said. “Take upon yourselves that great challenge…to live out the life of reconciliation in all that we say and do.”Tom Sutcliffe of the Diocese of Southwark voted against the legislation in 2012 because he felt it would have divided the church. He told synod on July 14 that he would be voting in favor of the measure today because he believes it makes adequate provisions for those who cannot accept women as bishops. “We must act on our conviction that the church needs the gifts of women bishops,” he said, adding that he is “immensely optimistic” about the future.Bishop John Goddard of Burnley said he would be voting against the legislation, but acknowledged that if the measure passes he would commit to working with those who disagree with him. “I respect your ‘yes’ just as I hope you respect my ‘no’,” he said. “So we live in disagreement and we look forward … to working in a way in which we participate in the Lordship of Christ, in his grace together and above all in engaging in mission together. By engaging in mission together we will be transformed.”Jane Patterson, a lay member from the Diocese of Sheffield, also said she’d be voting against the measure. However, she noted that the guiding principles give some grounds for hope and “I commit to serving [God] in his church whatever the result today.”Prudence Dailey of the Diocese of Oxford, who in November 2012 voted against the measure, told synod that today she would be abstaining because, although “we’ve arrived at a much better point” with the current legislation, she still struggles with the principle of women being bishops.The news comes as the U.S.-based Episcopal Church prepares to celebrate 40 years since the first women were ordained as priests, albeit irregularly, on July 29, 1974.The Episcopal Church passed legislation to enable women to become priests and bishops in 1976, although it would be another 13 years before the Rt. Rev. Barbara Harris was consecrated as suffragan bishop of Massachusetts, becoming the Anglican Communion’s first female bishop.History of women’s ordained ministry in the Church of EnglandThe Church of England opened the priesthood to women in November 1992, five years after women first were ordained to the diaconate. More than 5,000 women have been ordained as priests in England since 1994 and today they represent nearly 40 percent of all clergy.In July 2005, 13 years after agreeing to ordain female priests, the General Synod began its steady course toward allowing them to become bishops when it passed a motion to remove the legal obstacles to ordaining women as bishops.In July 2006, the synod called for the practical and legislative arrangements of admitting women to the episcopate to be explored. It also called for the formation of a legislative drafting group to prepare a draft measure and amending canon necessary to remove the legal obstacles.At its July 2008 group of sessions, synod agreed that it was the “wish of its majority … for women to be admitted to the episcopate” and affirmed that “special arrangements be available, within the existing structures of the Church of England, for those who as a matter of theological conviction will not be able to receive the ministry of women as bishops or priests.”General Synod voted in February 2009 to send a draft measure on women becoming bishops to a revision committee so it could rework the legislation.The revision committee met 16 times beginning in May 2009 and considered 114 submissions from synod members and a further 183 submissions from others. In May 2010, the committee published a 142-page report, which offered a detailed analysis of the draft legislation in time for the July 2010 synod debate and vote.The July 2010 synod backed legislation that paved the way for women to become bishops and referred the measure to diocesan synods for their consideration. A majority of diocesan synods needed to approve the measure for it to return to General Synod.From July 2010 to February 2012, 42 of the 44 diocesan synods throughout England approved the legislation supporting female bishops.The February 2012 General Synod rejected a bid to provide greater concessions for those opposed to female bishops. Those concessions essentially were an amendment to the legislation that would have enabled two bishops to exercise episcopal functions within the same jurisdiction by way of “co-ordinating” their ministries.The Anglican Communion’s path to women’s ordinationThe long path towards accepting women’s ordained ministry in the Anglican Communion began in 1920 when the Lambeth Conference called (via Resolutions 47-52) for the diaconate of women to be restored “formally and canonically,” adding that it should be recognized throughout the communion.The first female priest in the communion, the Rev. Li Tim-Oi, was ordained in Hong Kong in 1944. Due to outside pressure, she resigned her license, but not her holy orders, following World War II. In 1971, the Rev. Jane Hwang and the Rev. Joyce Bennett were ordained priests in the Diocese of Hong Kong, though their ministries were not recognized in many parts of the Anglican Communion.In 1974, there was the “irregular” ordination of 11 women in the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, which officially authorized women’s priestly ordination two years later.Bishop Barbara Harris, now retired, was elected bishop suffragan of Massachusetts in 1988 and became the Anglican Communion’s first female bishop after her consecration and ordination in 1989.The Rt. Rev. Penelope Jamieson made history in 1989 when she was elected bishop of the Diocese of Dunedin, New Zealand, and became the first woman to serve as a diocesan bishop in the Anglican Communion.The Rt. Rev. Mary Adelia McLeod, who was ordained a priest in 1980, was ordained and consecrated in 1993 as bishop of the Diocese of Vermont, becoming the first female diocesan bishop in the U.S.-based Episcopal Church. She retired in 2001.The Rt. Rev. Canon Nerva Cot Aguilera became the first female Anglican bishop in Latin America when she was consecrated bishop suffragan of the Episcopal Church of Cuba in June 2007.The Rev. Ellinah Ntombi Wamukoya on Nov. 17, 2012 was ordained as bishop of Swaziland and became the first female bishop in any of the 12 Anglican provinces in Africa.The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori, previously bishop of Nevada, became the Anglican Communion’s first female primate in November 2006 when she was invested as presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church.– Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Belleville, IL July 14, 2014 at 2:15 pm I find it appalling that intelligent Anglicans worldwidestruggle over all these non-issues but fail to educate themselves on thetrue “pagan” origins of Christianity, and continue to recite the Nicene Creedwith their fingers crossed behind their back. When will a true leader emerge who cansincerely talk about about this great hoax of our age instead of the controversial legislation regarding “ordaining women as bishops”. Submit a Press Release Vara Sue Tamminga says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC July 14, 2014 at 4:30 pm I rejoice at this news. Women clergy have taught me so much about God. They show the feminine side of God as expressed in Genesis where God created male and female in God’s image. In order to have female’s created in God’s image, God must also be female as well as male. Men tend to be threatened by women clergy. They conjure up all sorts of reasons why women should not be ordained. Apparently they forget the involvement of women in Jesus ministry. They also forget that His ministry was financed by wealthy women. And by the way, I don’t say the Nicene Creed with my fingers crossed behind my back. I say it because I believe it. I have faith in what it proclaims. I’m a biologist by educational training and I believe in both evolution and “creationism” as well. It isn’t contradictory or difficult. The Nicene Creed simply outlines what we believe. It doesn’t provide a mechanism for such things as the birth of Jesus, His resurrection or ascension. I see evolution as the mechanism by which God created. I don’t have a clue about how Jesus was conceived, but it doesn’t matter, what matters is that conception took place and Jesus was born. I have no idea how God resurrected the dead body of Jesus. It doesn’t matter, what matters is that resurrection took place. There are such things as Holy Mysteries….and we take them on faith and trust alone, not on how or if we understand how they work, happened or whatever. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 15, 2014 at 11:52 am Let us not forget that the very structure of the Church is conservative. A two-thirds majority was required in all three Houses of Synod for this to pass. This indeed represents widespread consensus in the Church of England on this issue. It’s wonderful news. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Denise Noel-DeBique says: Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN July 15, 2014 at 8:29 am “Ain’t that good news!” Submit an Event Listingcenter_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (10) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 14, 2014 at 7:48 pm Mr Garner,thank you very much for your comments on the Nicene Creed. July 15, 2014 at 5:17 am In fact we, in the Church of England, hope that they will be like the distinguished Bishops that you list here. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Women’s Ministry Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Church of England says ‘yes’ to women as bishops Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. Kathleen Cathey says: margaret davis says: Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN July 14, 2014 at 3:52 pm Though changes can be glacial, at least they are happening! Hooray for the Anglican Communion around the world, as men and women serve together ‘officially’ now, just as they have been for ages ‘in the trenches’ sharing the light of Christ. The Rev. Frank J. Corbishley says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Phillip Saleh says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Canada: New monastic project calls young women to grow in…

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA By ACNS staffPosted Oct 12, 2015 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby meets members of the Sisterhood of St. John the Divine in Spring 2014. Photo: SSJD[Anglican Communion News Service] Women aged between 22 and 40 are being invited to “spend a year in God’s rhythm” while they learn to pray, serve others and study, while living in intentional community alongside the Sisterhood of Saint John the Divine in Toronto, Canada.The community is offering up to 10 places a year as part of the “Companions on the Way” formation program, which begins in September 2016.The Sisterhood of St. John the Divine (SSJD) was founded in 1884 in Toronto, as part of the second generation of Sisterhoods emerging out the Oxford movement. It is a prayer and Gospel-centered monastic community bound together by the call to live out the baptismal covenant through the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.Over the past 130 years they have founded and ministered in hospitals, homes for the aged, schools, and community missions. Today, their focus is primarily on spiritual formation, spiritual direction, retreats, and spiritual care at a rehabilitation hospital founded by the sisters.“We feel strongly that God is calling us to this companions ministry for young women at the same time that we desire to renew our own mission as a contemporary monastic community,” the Rev. Sister Constance Joanna Gefvert, the coordinator of the SSJD companions, said. “We will be formed as much by them as they will by the experience of living among us.”While a number of contemporary communities have been formed as a result of the new monastic movement, the SSJD companions program is thought to be unique in offering a contemporary intentional community for women within an inherited monastic community.“The women who participate will build community among themselves and develop leadership skills that can be used in the emerging church at the same time that they are mentored by an existing community,” Gefvert said. “The closest thing I can think of is the St. Anselm community at Lambeth, being mentored by Chemin Neuf; but in our case the new provisional community is actually a part of an established permanent community.”The existing SSJD community is relatively small: it comprises 21 sisters plus three “Alongsiders” who are discerning entering the community and three other seriously engaged “Discerners.” And yet it is probably the largest of the Anglican/Episcopal communities in North America, apart from the Order of the Holy Cross.“Most of the sisters live at St. John’s Convent, with a few in Victoria,” Gefvert said. “There is a great deal of interest among the sisters in reclaiming our earliest mission to the poor and the sick, and that is one thing the companions will help us do.“If we have the full complement of 10 women coming for a year, there is not nearly enough work to be done at the home base. Partly for that reason, and even more importantly to meet the longing of young people to care for those on the margins of society, we are setting up volunteer opportunities in a number of ministries in Toronto – some of them part of our diocese, under the umbrella of FaithWorks, some connected with parish churches’ outreach ministries and Fresh Expressions, and some ministries of other denominations and agencies.”The community first began exploring the companions program in 2011, but felt it was important to evaluate its new “Alongsider” program first. Gefvert explained: “Our experience with Alongsiders has been very good, and has in fact brought some new [mostly middle-aged] members into the community.“Now we are ready to launch a program for younger women which will allow them to develop their own community within SSJD.“As the Archbishop of Canterbury said in his letter to religious orders a year ago, when he announced the St. Anselm community, we too hope that this program will plant new seeds of the religious life within the Anglican Communion.“We will be very happy if a couple of women decide to stay and help renew SSJD. However our main motive is a ministry to the church. I, and the sisters as a whole, believe strongly that the renewal of the church, and a healthy future, will come from the religious orders.“The current Archbishop of Canterbury said this to us when he was with our community last spring, as have the past two archbishops of Canterbury.”The Sisterhood of St. John the Divine will provide room and board for companions, who will share their gifts and skills with the community. The program is open to women who are members of the Body of Christ, whether through intention or baptism and regular participation in a spiritual community; and is open to both Canadians and international participants.There is also the opportunity for participants to receive academic credit for study undertaken through Wycliffe College at the Toronto School of Theology. Rector Belleville, IL Canada: New monastic project calls young women to grow in Christ Rector Knoxville, TN Comments are closed. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service October 19, 2015 at 1:56 pm “The existing SSJD community is relatively small … And yet it is probably the largest of the Anglican/Episcopal communities in North America, apart from the Order of the Holy Cross”. Okay, so it’s not “relatively small” then. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Geoff McLarney says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Anglican Communion, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC center_img Women’s Ministry Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Comments (1) Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more