Tickets Now Available for Nick Payne’s Incognito

first_img View Comments Tickets are now available for Manhattan Theater Club’s production of Nick Payne’s Incognito. Directed by Doug Hughes, the limited engagement begins on May 3 and will play through June 26 at City Center—Stage 1. Opening night is set for May 24.A pathologist steals the brain of Albert Einstein; a neuropsychologist embarks on her first romance with another woman; a seizure patient forgets everything but how much he loves his girlfriend. Incognito braids these mysterious stories into one breathtaking whole that asks whether memory and identity are nothing but illusions.Cast and creative team will be announced at a later date. Show Closed This production ended its run on July 10, 2016 Nick Payne(Photo: Bruce Glikas)center_img Related Shows Incognitolast_img read more

Long Island to South Africa: Connecting Continents Through the Classroom

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Twelve fifth-grade students gathered around a conference table at Long Island University at Post facing two flat screens on a rainy Monday morning. One screen reflected their own image, the other showed seven children about the same age, accompanied by their teacher and principal, in South Africa. They raised their hands excitedly, trying to wait their turns to talk, but there was so much to ask.Among the queries that arose: “Do you have violence there?”The dialogue, organized by Arnold Dodge, the chair of the Department of Educational Leadership and Administration at LIU-Post and John Singleton, principal of Clear Stream Avenue School in Valley Stream, was four years in the making. The idea is to get the children to discuss difficult social ideas and to recognize their significant similarities and in doing so, to dissolve their perceived differences. The children converse in real time about bullying, technology, music and the environment—satisfying their mutual curiosity of such vastly different cultures.“The curriculum has been focused on human rights,” Natalie Nelson, a fifth-grade teacher at Clear Stream, told the Press while fighting back considerable emotion. “The students learned about Nelson Mandela, who died when Mr. Singleton was visiting there in December.”To have the children actually speak to the students in South Africa, and to hear firsthand about apartheid, and to connect that with the segregation that these students experience, was incomparable, she said.Starting in 2008, Dodge’s academic research led him to study the impact of poverty on schools in South Africa. He crosses the globe every fall to visit South African schools and to connect with educators there. This past December, Singleton joined him, where they met Berte Van Wyck, the Professor of Education Policy Studies at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa and John Jacobs, the principal of the Marvin Park Primary School in Macassar, South Africa.“It takes you out of your egocentricity,” Nelson said, adding that kids feel their problems are common not only among other children in the United States, but across the globe as well. She noted that the experience of seeing children speak to the universality of issues like bullying is of monumental importance.There were some significant differences in the South African students’ day-to-day lives. One student spoke about how he had no running water in his house. Another had no electricity.“Many times, it’s the students who don’t have that shed light on those who do,” said Singleton, noting how the children would have a new-found appreciation for what they’d considered “essentials.”Valley Stream has undergone a big transformation, as it has become a “majority-minority” school, going from a 72-percent white student population in 1999 to 26-percent last year. Multilingual students from Clear Stream cross a diverse range of backgrounds. Similarly, the students of Marvin Park speak languages ranging from Afrikaan to French, Portuguese and English, among others.Clear Stream Avenue fifth-grader Anthony Pimento found it helpful to get a peek into their culture.“There’s a big difference,” he said, “because they have to share electricity.”South African students asked if American students had to pay for public education, prompting a quick lesson from Dodge on the complicated nature of the system supported by property taxes. South African schools are divided into “quintiles,” where a school’s financial backing is determined by the relative wealth of the students who attend. Marvin Park is a quintile one school, which means that it is of the poorest ranking—and the government provides the education.Singleton, showing pictures from his December trip to Marvin Park, pointed out the bars on the windows of the school designed to keep the students safe. He was curious to know if South African schools experience the school shooting phenomenon like American schools, but did not have time to ask. One of his students, however, broached the subject of the Nigerian girls who’d been kidnapped and asked how they kept themselves safe.Before the meeting, the students each composed biographies to share among each other across different social media platforms, essentially forming modern-day pen pal relationships. Afterward, Justin Gomez, another fifth-grader from Clear Stream Avenue School who approached the student meeting formally in a suit and tie, said he was impressed with his South African counterparts.“These kids are getting far with technology,” he said. “Technology brought us to the moon—and now this!”Dodge sees this opportunity as a catalyst for future endeavors including his ultimate goal: an international institute where students can connect through thoughtful conversation, music, dance, and technology both here and in South Africa. He is waiting on several grant applications that might let him facilitate global connections that might just change the world.last_img read more

Nussle talks CBO on CNBC’s closing bell

first_imgCUNA President/CEO Jim Nussle appeared on CNBC’s Closing Bell Wednesday to discuss the 2019-2028 economic outlook released by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). Nussle served as former director of the Office of Management and Budget from 2007 to 2009 and has extensive experience on the topic when he served in Congress from 1991 to 2007.“The CBO tends to be right down the middle in their forecast with a consensus that there will be a recession at the end of 2021,” said Nussle. “What is surprising is the unresolved deal on the trade war.” During the segment, Nussle discussed the report, general state of the economy, and how credit unions are helping members meet their financial needs.Nussle urged White House officials to find a resolution on trade, as it will affect jobs, consumer spending, and more. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

The number of landings and take-offs of aircraft in growth

first_imgThe largest passenger traffic was realized by Zagreb Airport with 189 thousand passengers (a decrease of 0,8% compared to January 2018), followed by Split Airport with 35 thousand passengers (an increase of 8,4% compared to January 2018) and Dubrovnik Airport with 26 thousand passengers (an increase of 18,6% compared to January 2018). In January 2019, Croatian airports recorded 257 thousand passengers, which is an increase of 2,1% compared to January 2018. The most significant international passenger traffic was realized with German airports, 75 thousand passengers, which is an increase of 6,2% compared to the same period in 2018.center_img The total number of aircraft landings and take-offs at airports in January 2019 was 4, an increase of 692% compared to January 3,8.last_img read more

Vouchers for travel agencies came into force

first_imgThe Ordinance on the manner of using vouchers for unexecuted travel contracts in a package deal was published in the Official Gazette on 22 May 2020 (NN 60/2020) and entered into force on the first day of publication. This Ordinance prescribes the manner of using vouchers issued by travel organizers for unexecuted package travel contracts that were to be executed after March 1, 2020, and were not executed due to special circumstances caused by the COVID-19 disease epidemic. The voucher is issued by the travel organizer within 14 days of the passenger’s request for a refund for the unexecuted package travel contract, and no later than 90 days from the day the trip was to begin. The voucher must be valid at least one year from the date of issue, within which period the traveler can arrange a replacement trip, excursion or other service, and can use it to pay for all new reservations even if the payment or service is made after the voucher expiration date and agreed before the voucher expiration date.center_img The voucher can be used to conclude a contract for a replacement trip in a package deal of equal, higher or lower value and / or quality, a trip or other travel service, in agreement with the passenger. Side dish: Official Gazette / RULEBOOK ON THE MANNER OF USING VOUCHERS FOR UNFINISHED TRAVEL CONTRACTS IN A PACKAGElast_img read more

Potential to renovate or detonate lures bidders

first_imgThe home at 23 Westgate Ave, Springwood.A DECEASED estate generated strong interest when it went under the hammer in Springwood recently.The property at 23 Westgate Ave sold at auction for $389,000 on Saturday, November 18.Marketing agents Bruce and Kathy Baker, of REMAX Territory, said the home attracted 12 registered bidders.“The opening bid was $300,000 and bidding was quiet active,” Mr Baker said. “Buyers were attracted to the potential to renovate or redevelop the property.”Sitting on 716sq m, the lowset brick home has three bedrooms, one bathroom and a single garage.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020Inside the home at 23 Westgate Ave, Springwood.There is also a separate lounge, kitchen and dining room.Mr Baker said about 40 parties inspected the home during the marketing campaign with most saying it needed major work or to be completely knocked down.“It’s not often properties like this become available in Springwood,” he said.Mr Baker said the Springwood market was performing well.“It’s very strong and we’re seeing both owner-occupiers and investors,” he said.“Location (is driving demand). Springwood is close to schools, transport and shopping.”last_img read more

Dawson signs new Baggies deal

first_img The 24-year-old centre back has started all six of Albion’s league matches and claimed his first goal for the club in the 4-0 win over Burnley on Sunday. Dawson’s new deal will keep him at The Hawthorns until 2017. Craig Dawson has signed a new three-year deal with West Brom. Press Associationcenter_img Albion head coach Alan Irvine said: “Obviously Craig was very unsettled when I first arrived in the summer but we as a club were never interested in selling him. “We felt he had the potential to be a top centre-back and once he got his head settled and knew he wasn’t going anywhere he started to put in very good performances. “His level of consistency has kept him in the team despite having our top international centre-backs breathing down his neck. “Getting a new contract, which he thoroughly deserves, completes a great start to the season for him and I’m really pleased for the lad.” Dawson, who can also slot in at right-back, joined the Baggies from Rochdale for an undisclosed fee in the summer of 2010, although he returned to his hometown club on loan for the 2010-11 season. His Albion debut came in the League Cup the following campaign and he was selected as part of Stuart Pearce’s Team GB squad at the London 2012 Olympic Games. Having started 2012/13 at The Hawthorns, Dawson went on to spend the second half of the season on loan at Bolton – featuring for England in the Under-21 European Championship that summer. Dawson, having signed fresh terms in February 2012, was previously contracted to the club until June 2015, with a further year’s option in Albion’s favour. last_img read more

Ten Positive Covid-19 Results from Top Two Leagues in Germany

first_imgTop-flight side Cologne have had no further Covid-19 infections after three people tested positive last week.The trio are “symptom-free” but remain in quarantine for 14 days, said the club.The Bundesliga is set to become the first major football league in Europe to return to competition.Officials suggested resuming on 9 May but the government delayed the decision and a restart may now be on 16 or 23 May.Cologne said in a statement that “only players who have been tested negatively twice in succession are allowed to train and play”.The DFL added: “A second wave of tests will be carried out this week – here too there may be isolated positive test results, especially since one of the tasks of this second round is to reduce the likelihood of ‘false negative’ findings that can never be completely ruled out.”Last week, chancellor Angela Merkel said that any decision on if and when sports activities could resume would be taken on Wednesday, 6 May.The league has been suspended since mid-March because of the global coronavirus pandemic.The DFL has warned that many top-division teams will be in an “existence-threatening” financial position if play does not resume by June.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Clubs in the top two German divisions have returned 10 positive results from 1,724 coronavirus tests, the German football league announced yesterday.Clubs have been training in groups, with the tests taken before a planned return to training as teams.Measures including “the isolation of the affected person” have been taken, said the DFL.last_img read more

Gbinije struggles in 1st crack at point guard in Holy Family exhibition

first_imgMichael Gbinije is still getting accustomed to playing point guard.He didn’t run the point in high school or at Duke. Now, while Tyler Ennis sits, Gbinije will bring the ball up.Gbinije struggled in his new role Friday in No. 8 Syracuse’s 79-41 exhibition win over Division II Holy Family at the Carrier Dome. The scrimmage showcased that while Syracuse is deep at nearly every position, it’s not deep at point guard. Gbinije turned the ball over five times and looked uncomfortable breaking the press.“When they pressured us,” Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim said, “he showed that’s where he struggles a little bit as a point guard.”Gbinije said playing point is difficult. He likes having the ball in his hands more often and facilitating for his teammates, but said the switch in positions has been tough.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textC.J. Fair said he tries to stay back with the guards to help them break the press. Holy Family pressed in spurts Friday and disrupted Gbinije’s flow at times.“It’s hard to break a press by yourself,” Fair said. “There’s a lot of new guys out there and they’re running around. It kind of puts you in a bad position.”Four of Gbinije’s turnovers came in the final 9:06, when Syracuse surrendered the ball eight times in total against Holy Family.Gbinije played 24 minutes on Friday, which tied with Fair for most on the team. He showcased his skill and multi-dimensionality, yet it was evident he simply isn’t used to playing point guard.“I think in the second half, things got a little messy,” Gbinije said, “but it’s only the first game and I think it’ll get better as the season goes on.”With one minute left in the game, Turhan Griffin deflected Gbinije’s pass and raced the other way for a layup.“He had some sloppy moments,” Boeheim said. “He’ll get through it.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 1, 2013 at 11:30 pm Contact Trevor: tbhass@syr.edu | @TrevorHasslast_img read more

Syracuse tries to give back to troops in Fort Drum stay

first_img Published on August 12, 2014 at 9:55 pm Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbb FORT DRUM, N.Y. — As much as head coach Scott Shafer praises the troops at Fort Drum for how they influence his Syracuse program, the feeling is mutual.“They look up to the players,” Dave Doyle, commander of the second brigade combat team at Fort Drum, said of the troops. “Some of the players that these troops are going to eat breakfast with are going to be on the field matching skills against some of the best players in the country. They’ll remember that.The Orange is back in Fort Drum for training camp for the third year in a row, and the budding relationship indicates that the tradition won’t be ending anytime soon. Syracuse kicked off its stay at the army reservation, which is situated just Northeast of Watertown, N.Y., on Tuesday and will interact with troops on the base each day until Friday.Former Syracuse head coach Doug Marrone started the trend in 2012, and his successor Shafer  — whose uncle, cousin and two grandfathers all served in the military — gladly carries it on.Some of the troops that the Orange interacted with last year were deployed to Afghanistan but have returned in time to reconnect with the players all over again.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“To me, coming from a big military family, I’m taken back when I get around you guys,” Shafer said in a press conference after his team’s practice Tuesday. “It’s just great to be part of this. I’m looking forward to meeting the new faces and new names and I hope some of those troops and players can rekindle their relationships.”SU benefits from the experience in three major ways, Shafer said.“For our guys to sit across from the troops,” Shafer said, “and understand, ‘Hey, I’m 21. He’s 21. He’s up in the mountains in Afghanistan putting it on the line for our country so I can go out and play football,’ that’s the first thing we get out of it.”The Orange also learns how to maximize its small-group leadership from the Fort Drum troops, the head coach added, but the trip is also a chance to offer something in return to the troops.“Anything that we can give back to them in some small degree — and that’s all it is, really, is a small degree — is something that we take great pride in,” Shafer said. “I think this thing is just going to blow up in the next few years and I’m excited to be a small part of that.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more