Tropical Storm Hanna Preparations

first_imgAlthough there is no certainty that Tropical Storm Hanna will have significant impact on Nova Scotia, the Emergency Management Office is advising citizens to make appropriate preparations. “It’s always important for Nova Scotians to have an emergency kit prepared, especially during hurricane season,” said Emergency Management Minister Carolyn Bolivar-Getson. “With the potential for significant wind or rainfall from Hanna, people should remember to stock up on non-perishable food and water, bring in lawn furniture, and monitor weather forecasts.” Environment Canada forecasts that Hanna will transition to a post-tropical storm with sustained winds of 83 km/h on Sunday, Sept. 7. No potential landfall for Nova Scotia is projected until Sunday. The Emergency Management Office is monitoring the situation. The Canadian Hurricane Centre’s most recent update at 3 p.m. today, Sept. 4, indicated that Tropical Storm Hanna was located about 330 kilometres East of Nassau, the Bahamas. Maximum sustained winds were estimated at 102 km/h. Hanna was moving at 22 km/h. A home emergency kit should be packed so that it is easy to carry in the event of an evacuation. It should include: — Two litres of water per person per day. Include small bottles for easy carrying — Food items that won’t spoil, such as canned food, energy bars and dried foods. Remember to replace the food and water once a year — Manual can opener — Flashlight and batteries — Battery–powered or wind–up radio, and extra batteries — First aid kit — Special needs items such as prescription medications, infant formula or equipment for people with disabilities — Extra keys for your car and house — Cash, including smaller bills and change for payphones It is also advisable to have an emergency kit in your vehicle at all times. Information on assembling home and vehicle emergency kits is available on the Emergency Management Office’s website, www.gov.ns.ca/emo or by phoning 1-866-424-5620.last_img read more

UN system responds to floods in Nicaragua

The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Food Programme (WFP) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) have carried out assessment missions and are working in support of the country’s Ministries of Health, Education, Agriculture and Family.On Tuesday, Nicaragua’s National Emergency Committee convened a meeting with representatives of the international community to present the situation and call for help. According to the Committee, more than 18,000 people in 54 communities have been affected, 25 have died and over 2,000 acres of crops have been damaged. read more