Meet Jane – A Center of Excellence Patient

first_img July 18, 2016   SHARE  TWEET Meet Jane – A Center of Excellence Patient Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Substance Use Disorder,  The Blog Centers of Excellence help ensure that people with opioid-related substance use disorder stay in treatment to receive follow-up care and are supported within their communities. Care management teams coordinate care and provide warm transitions to new parts of the treatment process.A common misconception about the Centers of Excellence is that they are only physical locations where people can walk in and receive treatment. While most of the centers will provide direct treatment, in reality when we use the term “center” we are referring to a central, efficient hub around which treatment revolves. These centers will have navigators to assist people with opioid-related substance use disorders though the medical system, and ensure they receive behavioral and physical health care, as well as any evidence-based medication-assisted treatment needed.To better explain how Centers of Excellence work, let’s use an example.Meet Jane. Jane is suffering from opioid use disorder. When she decided to get treatment for her illness, she sought initial help at a health care facility – like a hospital, her primary care physician, or with a behavioral health specialist. Let’s say Jane went to her primary care physician – Dr. Smith.With informed consent, Dr. Smith notifies the Center of Excellence team that Jane is seeking treatment. A Center of Excellence health team professional – let’s call this person Tim – arrives on site and completes an assessment of Jane to determine her specific needs. Tim then develops a treatment plan for Jane that recommends the appropriate level of care.Tim then ensures coordination of Jane’s care with a Center of Excellence team. If Jane consents, her family can also be involved in Jane’s care. Other members of her Center of Excellence team may include behavioral and physical health care providers, community-based care navigators, and community-based resources that can help Jane obtain food, housing, and apply for jobs.Tim sets Jane up with Dr. Mansfield – a drug and alcohol (D&A) provider that will help Jane with her opioid use disorder. But in addition to her opioid use disorder, Jane also has anxiety and asthma. In order to help treat Jane as a whole person, Tim connects Jane with Dr. Boyer, a mental health provider that can help treat Jane’s anxiety, and Dr. Nolan, a physical health provider that can help treat Jane’s asthma.Behavioral health providers include mental health providers as well as D&A providers. D&A providers – like Dr. Mansfield – help provide evidence-based treatment which would include recovery supports, cognitive behavioral therapy, drug and alcohol counseling, rehabilitation services, and detoxification. Mental health providers – like Dr. Boyer – would provide evidence based treatment consisting of counseling or talking therapies and medications for conditions such as anxiety, severe depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.Physical health providers – like Dr. Nolan – would provide treatment for conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, heart attack, and seizures but could also treat anxiety and depression.Both physical health and behavioral health physicians that have specific training can provide medication assisted treatment for opioid use disorder with medications such as methadone and buprenorphine.Jane will receive all available supports coordinated by her Centers for Excellence team such as referral to employment services, housing support, legal support, and faith based resources. The care team, which is led and coordinated by Tim, oversees everything from the evaluation to the referral process, through follow-up care.This is how Jane receives the treatment she needs and starts on the path to recovery through the Centers of Excellence. Working with Tim, her family, Dr. Smith, Dr. Mansfield, Dr. Boyer, and Dr. Nolan, Jane is able to get the care that she needs.Investing in Addiction TreatmentGovernor Wolf’s 2016-2017 budget included $10 million in behavioral health funding and $5 million in Medical Assistance funding, totaling $15 million. This will allow DHS to draw down $5.4 million in federal funding for an overall total of $20.4 million.This critical funding will enable the Department of Human Services, during phase one, to implement 20 Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) Centers of Excellence that will treat approximately 4,500 people like Jane that currently are not able to access treatment.The Department is also working with its actuaries to determine the number of additional centers that can be funded with the $5 million in state Medical Assistance funds and $5.4 million in federal funds by analyzing the impact they will have on Medicaid managed care rates. The Department of Human Services will announce any additional Medicaid-funded OUD Centers of Excellence in August. By: Sarah Galbally, Secretary of Policy and Planning SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

More stranded Bacolod, NegOcc OFWs, LSIs repatriated

first_imgGov. Eugenio Jose Lacson, meanwhile, said repatriated Negros Occidental OFWs no longer have to complete their 14-day quarantine if they yield negative results for the virus before completing the required number of isolation days.  From May 25 to June 1 alone, this province received 601 returning residents while this city has accommodated some 348 persons who arrived either on sweeper flights or through 2GO Group’s Malasakit Voyage trips. BACOLOD City – More overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) and locally stranded individuals who are residents of Bacolod City and Negros Occidental have returned home from Metro Manila. At the Bredco port here, meanwhile, 16 OFWs from this province and five from this city, along with two LSIs, arrived onboard a 2GO Group vessel at about 8:30 a.m. the same day. Based on local health protocols, returning residents – whether OFWs or LSIs – are required to undergo mandatory two-week quarantine in patient care centers and subject themselves to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction tests for COVID-19. They were part of the second week of arrivals in this province following President Rodrigo Duterte’s directive on May 25 to immediately return all OFWs stuck at coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) quarantine centers in the National Capital Region to their respective homes.center_img At around 7:35 a.m. on June 3, 38 passengers – 26 Negrenses, 11 Bacolodnons and one LSI – arrived at the Bacolod-Silay Airport in Silay City via an AirAsia sweeper flight. Another batch of overseas Filipino workers and locally stranded individuals who are residents of Bacolod City and different cities and municipalities in Negros Occidental arrive at the Bacolod-Silay Airport in Silay City on June 3 via an AirAsia sweeper flight. PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT OF NEGROS OCCIDENTAL VIA PNA This June, the first flight arrived at the Bacolod-Silay Airport on Monday morning. It was an AirAsia sweeper flight that carried 12 residents of Bacolod City and 19 from various cities and municipalities in this province.(With a report from PNA/PN)last_img read more

Golden game

first_imgStudents attending the USC vs. UCLA basketball game Sunday afternoon at the Galen Center wearing all gold to support the team. To sit in the lower bowl of the student section, students were required to wear yellow shirts. USC Spirit Leaders and members of Trojan Pride led the student section in cheers, although Trojans lost to UCLA, 75-69.Ralf Cheung | Daily Trojanlast_img

Ellen Nominates New Heads of APR Panel

first_imgPresident Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, as Chairperson of the African Peers Review (APR) Forum, has nominated, for consideration and appointment two prominent diplomats to head the APR Panel of eminent persons.Those nominated by the Liberian leader include Ambassador Fatuma Nyirakobwa Ndangiza of Rwanda and Ambassador Ashraf Rashed of Egypt as the new Chairperson and Vice Chairperson, respectively, of the APR Panel.Heads of State and Government are presently in the Ethiopian Capital, Addis-Ababa, attending the 22nd Ordinary Session of the African Union (AU), where several cardinal issues including a report of activities of the AU Peace and Security Council and the state of peace and security in Africa. The AU leaders have also launched 2014 as the Year of Agriculture and Food Security in Africa.President Sirleaf made the nomination, according to a dispatch from the Ethiopia Capital, Addis-Ababa on Wednesday 29, 2014, when she chaired the 20th Summit of the Committee of Heads of State and Government of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM).Ambassador Ndangiza succeeds the outgoing Chairperson of the APR Panel, Barrister Akere Tabeng Muna of Cameroon, who served as a Panel Member from 2003 to January 2014. She was first appointed as member of the APR Panel of Eminent Persons at the 16th Summit of the APR Forum in January 2012. The new Vice-Chair was at the same time appointed to the APR Panel.Additionally, President Sirleaf recommended the appointment of three distinguished Africans as new Panel Members to replace Barrister Muna (Cameroon), Barrister Jullienne Onziel Gnelenga (Congo Brazzaville) and Dr. Amos C. Sawyer (Liberia) whose four-year tenure as Panel Members expires this month.Those preferred by the Liberian leader are: Edem Kojo (Togo), Professor Abo Mengeuel (Sudan), and Mr. Mahamoud Yossouf Khayal (Chad).President Sirleaf lauded the outgoing panelists, for what she termed their invaluable role in the progress of APRM, “…and I look forward to your continued support to this proud Pan-African initiative.”She pointed out that in the last 10 years, the APRM has proven itself an important tool for detecting possible fault lines in the continent’s national governance systems; has shown its strength as an early warning mechanism for emerging issues and potential crisis in some countries reviewed; and has equally provided an opportunity to showcase the best practices in some countries on the continent.President Sirleaf maintained that Africa’s success in achieving the standards set for good governance is heavily dependent on its ability to ensure self-governance and respect for the rules, protocols, and structures that constitute the Mechanism.She cautioned the important strengthening the lines of communication between the bodies that make up the APRM, to ensure that informed and prudent administrative decisions are made by those vested with the proper authority to make them. “This includes the implementation of the Mechanism structure which was approved by the Forum in May 2013,” she said.She called for the vetting of staff of the APRM Secretariat with swiftness and urgency, stressing that it must be done transparently and fairly. She thanked South Africa for agreeing to undertake the hiring of a firm to facilitate the recruitment process.President Sirleaf had recommended that the APRM Forum be made a permanent part of the African Union system, and urged the Committee of Heads of State of the Forum to support and protect the continent’s mechanism in fulfilling its mandate for the benefit of Africa.Speaking earlier, the Prime Minister of Ethiopia, Haile Mariam Desalegn, expressed gratitude to President Sirleaf for the exemplary leadership of the APRM Forum.PM Desalegn, who is also Chairperson of the Assembly of AU, said APR Forum is the means by which the continent can say no to undue interference from outside forces; and when the continent knows exactly what to do to ensure security, good governance, development and democratic rule. He hoped that more countries would accede to the APRM Process.The Chairperson of the AU Commission, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, recognized the APRM Forum as the continent’s self-monitoring mechanism that must be supported by all of its leaders.Madam Zuma, who is the wife of South African President, Jacob Zuma, reminded the forum members that the APRM Forum was created in 2003 to help promote good governance and economic change, and insisted that the APRM represents an early warning system for potential problems in Member States.The APR Mechanism, an initiative of the African Union that was established in March 2003 by the Heads of State and Government Implementation Committee of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), is an instrument for monitoring performance in governance among Member States, and provides support for the improvement of such performance.Thirty-four AU Member States, including Liberia, have voluntarily acceded to the Mechanism. Seventeen countries that have completed their self-assessment have been peer-reviewed by the Forum of Heads of State and Government.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more