Lack of experience, chemistry doomed GlobalPort in loss to Gins, says Anthony

first_img“We’re a young team. We’re a new team, and we gotta learn to play with each other still. We have five rookies, four new players, and a new coach, so we’re gonna just look at the positives,” he said.In control for the first three quarters, the Batang Pier lost grip of the game in the fourth frame as the Gin Kings exploded for 36 points.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk“We had the lead almost the whole game, up until the end, and we had our spots. We just didn’t close it down the stretch,” he said.“Our lack of team chemistry and our youth showed, but those are things we can improve on, and we will get better on that and we’ll learn to close out games down the stretch. We just got to learn quicker.” OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina MOST READ Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netCharge it to experience.Sean Anthony opted to look at the positives rather than dwell on the negatives following GlobalPort’s 97-104 defeat to Ginebra on Sunday.ADVERTISEMENT OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Scottie Thompson also worthy of Finals MVP, thinks Cone Meralco ‘never the same’ after Almazan injury in PBA Finals Brian Heruela arrival bolsters Phoenix backcourt, defense Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours The defeat spoiled Anthony’s third-highest scoring output in the PBA with 29 points as GlobalPort continued its search for its first win of the new season.Still, the hardworking forward is seeing signs of progress.”We’re growing and we’re getting better as a team.”“I think we went from 20-plus turnovers in the last game to 13 turnovers this game, so we’re cleaning it up, having more assists, shooting better percentages. Now it’s learning to play team defense down the stretch and limiting our mental turnovers,” he said. “Ginebra is such a smart team and a veteran team. They capitalized on our mental mistakes, and that’s something we’ll learn and get better from.”The Batang Pier seek to end their misery on Friday against Rain or Shine.ADVERTISEMENT Mixed feelings for Kevin after losing to dad Louie in PBA LATEST STORIES Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

What Can We Learn from Eric Duncan?

first_imgCan the death of Ebola-infected Eric Duncan in a United States hospital teach us anything?We believe it surely can.  The first lesson we can learn is that none of us should take Ebola for granted.  It can be, and often indeed is, a death sentence, though, as we have seen in the case of many survivors, it does not have to be.When in 1976 Zaire (now Democratic Republic of Congo) reported the first Ebola outbreak, statistics showed that 90% of those infected died.  Today in Liberia, statistics indicate that over 50% of the Ebola infected die.This means that we are dealing with a highly dangerous, indeed deadly disease. The second lesson we can learn from Eric’s death is that the minute we sense the symptoms, we should run to a treatment center.  Once there, the ball is in the government’s court.  The center must be prepared to receive the patient and begin immediate observation, treatment and care.  Too many people have died unnecessarily because in their desperation, they have gone to treatment centers only to be turned back because of no space. We are grateful for the good news that engineers of the Armed Forces of Liberia and the United States military contingent here are building new treatment centers in many parts of the country.  We are also appreciative of the ELWA treatment center and others operated by Medecin Sans Frontier (MSF), which have been treating patients successfully and discharging them.  We pray that construction work on the new centers will be expeditiously completed, so that the infected may receive immediate relief and healing.The third lesson we can learn from our brother Eric is honesty.  We are compelled to be honest with ourselves and all others around us.  We must realize that it is highly dangerous to engage in what Winston Churchill called “terminological inexactitude,” which means a lie or untruth.  See how far Duncan’s lie led him—all the way across the Atlantic and into contact with airline passengers and crew, as well as his fiancé and all the others in the home and neighborhood in Dallas, Texas.  It is only by the grace of God that so far, no one has been found to have been infected by him.  Let us pray it remains that way.  The fact is that if we are not honest with ourselves we could infect others, as we saw in the case of Miss Liberia in Caldwell, where she and several others in the household died.We keep referring to great example of the Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Bernice Dahn, and Madam Yah Zolia, both of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, who quarantined themselves the moment they discovered that they had been in contact with infected persons—who later died.  That is the way to do it.  In the process, many lives will be saved.What next can we learn from Eric?  Many Liberians interviewed following his death in a U.S. hospital said they were not surprised.  They recalled that two U.S. citizens who traveled back to the USA with the same infection from the same Liberia were cured.We cannot cast aspersion (misleading charge) on the Presbyterian Health Center where Eric was   treated and died.  We believe they did their best for him.  The only problem was that when he first appeared there, with a temperature of 100 degrees, instead of immediately detecting an abnormality, they gave him tablets and let him go.  There is a good chance that had they, knowing his nationality, tested him for Ebola, he might have had a chance of survival.  But by the time he paid his second visit, it was apparently too late.Our final point is about Liberians asking why did Eric die in an American hospital when two Americans were cured in American medical institutions.  This seems to be a lesson we Liberians have difficulty learning: the Americans, like most other nationalities, know how to look after one another.  Do we in Liberia? NO!  We prefer looking after other people rather than ourselves.  See how two Lebanese rapists who viciously assaulted Liberian women were freed by Liberian courts.What is the lesson there?        Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more