FLU SERIES Lessons learned from this year’s vaccine crisis

first_img One aspect of such collaboration is clarifying legal and liability issues, said Ned Calonge, MD, MPH, chief medical officer for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE). Redistributing vaccine, for example, might go more smoothly if officials could clarify who pays whom and how, as well as what liability issues affect state law. See also: “We’re hopeful that one, two, or maybe more companies will be interested in selling [flu vaccine] in the US,” said Strikas. “Then, if one has a hiccup, one or more can step in.” April 8, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The only thing more unpredictable than the fickle, fast-changing influenza virus may be the US flu season itself. Yet health experts who weathered this year’s vaccine shortfall, which began early in October with the news that Chiron Corp. couldn’t deliver nearly half of the expected US vaccine supply, have found the 2004-05 flu season instructive. The lessons they draw may prove helpful in managing future problems with supply and distribution and also in facing the possibility of pandemic influenza. Stearns County, about 70 miles northwest of the Twin Cities, did a fine job ensuring that people received vaccine through an effective local collaboration, said Ehresmann, adding that MDH is encouraging similar efforts throughout the state. Anticipating the worst: pandemic fluLast fall, Coloradoans conducted a mass vaccination clinic in a small area to measure the state’s ability to meet a mass vaccination target. It turned out to be one of the bright spots in the season, according to Calonge. Volunteers and ham radio operators helped coordinate the vaccine transfer among many counties. A daunting target vaccination rate proved more achievable than officials expected. In addition, the MDH is working to enhance communication among those involved in flu immunization, Ehresmann said. Her office is convening a statewide workgroup on flu that will allow state officials to consult directly with healthcare providers in groups that may be affected by changes in the disease or the vaccine supply. In addition, the department is encouraging creation of community coalitions. Shortage turns to surplusNearly half of the expected US flu vaccine supply disappeared last fall because of contamination problems at a Chiron Corp. plant in England. Eventually, the country obtained about 61 million doses of flu vaccine instead of the roughly 100 million doses expected earlier. “Partnership was a critical piece of what we did,” Strikas said. “There needs to be coordination, particularly while the product is in short supply.” Although some state and local public health departments reported instances when they physically held or transferred flu vaccine, simply knowing where the doses are is often more important than having them in hand, officials said. “We were really cautious—and rightly so—about supply, but we have always had vaccine that goes unused,” Ehresmann said. But the surplus suggests to her that MDH must “do the least restrictive limiting we can possibly do, so we don’t end up wasting vaccine,” she said. Multiple suppliers wantedHaving two companies—Chiron Corp. and Sanofi-Pasteur (formerly Aventis Pasteur)—provide the bulk of the nation’s flu vaccine doesn’t leave much room for handling problems, experts said. “We came away convinced that if we needed to use that process for pandemic flu, we could meet the vaccine requirement,” Calonge said.center_img “Both influenza disease and vaccine supply are unpredictable,” he told CIDRAP News. His list of lessons learned or reinforced this season highlights preparation: expect the unexpected, plan for many scenarios, be flexible, and be proactive. Despite the shortfall, good news was plentiful this flu season. It was only a moderate season, with illness peaking in mid-February, according to a CDC recap in this week’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). The season was milder for kids this year, with far lower hospitalization rates than in the previous season. And an estimated 17 million Americans refrained from getting a flu shot so that doses would go to high-risk people. Targeting those at greater risk from the flu proved effective, with vaccination rates for the high-risk groups hewing closely to the levels of previous years despite the reduced vaccine supply, MMWR reported March 31. It’s not clear how many leftover doses may be in the hands of individual providers or groups. Ehresmann estimated that the number is in the thousands. Doses are only good for one season because the combination of viral strains used in the vaccine is changed every year, so many of the remaining doses may go to waste. Web-based partnershipsVirtual vaccine distribution systems may be increasingly important to managing supply during a flu season. Think of it as a way for many people to communicate effectively about vaccine orders, manufacturers, and supplies even in the off-season. Health officials in Minnesota found the same thing, and are taking steps to formalize new relationships before the next flu season. Calonge, with Colorado, called the current system too risky. “It’s a more fragile system than I would like to see,” he said. In the end, the expected vaccine shortage turned into a surplus: 3 million doses, roughly the equivalent of the CDC stockpile, remains, Strikas said. In Minnesota, for instance, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) is launching an Internet-based data collection tool, said Kristen Ehresmann, RN, MPH, manager of the department’s immunization, tuberculosis, and international health section. Local public health workers will be able to track vaccine orders by healthcare providers, such as hospitals and nursing homes, as well as by manufacturers. The information will be accessible online, so “we’ll go into the season knowing where people ordered from and how many doses they’re expecting,” Ehresmann said. Expecting the unexpectedFlu vaccine can take a lot of detours between the egg and the arm. That’s why flexibility is key, said Dr. Raymond Strikas, associate director for the adult immunization program at the National Immunization Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CDC. Estimated influenza vaccination coverage among adults and children—United States, September 1, 2004–January 31, 2005. MMWR 2005 Apr 1;54(12):304-7 [Full text] CDC. Update: Influenza activity—United States, 2004-05 season, April 8, 2005. MMWR 2005 Apr 8:54(13): 328-331 [Full text]last_img read more

How dressing room fight propelled Eagles to win AFCON 2013 trophy – Onazi

first_imgOgenyi Onazi has revealed how a breakout in the dressing room propelled the Super Eagles players to go all out for the 2013 AFCON trophy in South Africa. Loading… “Coach Stephen was just looking at us, then after the altercations, he addressed the team and told us we can’t afford to win the next game. “He then charged us to take the fight to the pitch and luckily we won the next game and moved to the next round,” Onazi told www.brila.net. The Super Eagles defeated the Eagles of Mali and favorites Elephants before Burkina Faso to lift their third continental crown, however, Onazi who now plays for the Turkish side Denizlispor said Nigerians didn’t give the team a chance against Didier Drogba led Ivorians. read also:Onazi: I never had any problem with Mikel Obi “No one gave us a chance against Ivory Coast, because of how we struggled in the previous matches, but we won the game and then things became very open for the team.” He said. After winning the tournament, the Super Eagles also reached the round of 16 of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil where they lost to France. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 The combative midfielder tagged the success as one of the most memorable moments and the high points of his successful football career. An elated Onazi who is still relishing the moment told brila.net that winning the title didn’t come without a price as the fight broke out in the dressing following the failure of the team to win the opening two matches against Zambia and Burkina Faso. Onazi stressed further that it took the intervention of the late Stephen Keshi before normalcy returned to the dressing room. “After we drew the first two matches, Nigerians were calling us to draw soup, but after these two games, we were fighting in the dressing room and there was a lot of blame game and noise .” He said.Advertisement Promoted Content7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty PennyTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All Time5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks6 Great Ancient Mysteries That Make China Worth VisitingDid You Know There’s A Black Hole In The Milky Way?10 Stargazing Locations To ‘Connect With Nature’Which Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Value10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A DroneYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Waylast_img read more