Jose Mourinho gives his verdict on Harry Kane’s late penalty shout in Tottenham’s draw with Arsenal

first_imgJose Mourinho gives his verdict on Harry Kane’s late penalty shout in Tottenham’s draw with Arsenal Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterSunday 1 Sep 2019 7:29 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.8kShares Tottenham star Harry Kane had a late shout for a penalty against Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Jose Mourinho believes referee Martin Atkinson was right to turn down Harry Kane’s late shout for a penalty in Tottenham’s 2-2 draw with Arsenal.Kane scored from the spot to double Spurs’ lead in the 40th minute – following Christian Eriksen’s opener – before Alexandre Lacazette dragged the Gunners back into the game with a classy solo effort on half-time.Arsenal found an equaliser as Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang prodded home Matteo Guendouzi’s pinpoint ball in the 71st minute, but their hard work looked to have been in vain as Sokratis Papastathopoulos appeared to shove Kane to the ground inside the box at the death.AdvertisementAdvertisementHowever, Atkinson waved away the Tottenham captain’s calls for a spot-kick and the points were shared at the Emirates.ADVERTISEMENT Arsenal 2-2 Tottenham: Mauricio Pochettino press conferenceTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 6:48FullscreenArsenal 2-2 Tottenham: Mauricio Pochettino press conferencehttps://metro.co.uk/video/arsenal-2-2-tottenham-mauricio-pochettino-press-conference-1997084/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Asked whether Arsenal should have been awarded the penalty, ex-Chelsea and Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho told Sky Sports: ‘I’ve seen penalties for less but I don’t think so.‘Without the VAR i would say no for sure. With the VAR now, everybody is at risk.‘In the other countries where the VAR has been in practice for a couple of years, like Portugal and Germany, I’ve seen worse.’ Kane scored from the penalty spot in the first half (Picture: Getty)Former Arsenal and Spurs defender Sol Campbell added: ‘I think, once you get in the box, obviously the forward is in control so you have got to be be careful.‘He does come across to shield the ball but maybe a little too much and obvious but you do run the risk.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityKane argued that Tottenham may have been awarded a penalty if Atkinson had consulted with VAR.‘As a striker, if it is on halfway it is a definite foul,’ he told BBC Sport.‘In the box you don’t always get them. He’s come through the back of me but it is 50/50.‘VAR would probably have backed the ref in this.’Should Kane have been awarded the penalty?No0%Yes0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your resultsMORE: Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang rates Arsenal’s front three after starting together in north London derby Advertisement Commentlast_img read more

Gov. Wolf Calls for Paid Sick and Family Leave for Workers

first_imgGov. Wolf Calls for Paid Sick and Family Leave for Workers August 31, 2020 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Economy,  Press Release As Pennsylvanians continue to fight the health risks of COVID-19, Governor Tom Wolf is calling for the General Assembly to pass legislation for paid sick and family leave for workers who need to miss work for an illness or to take care of a loved one.“Pennsylvanians are working hard, especially during this pandemic, and they should not have to choose between losing a day’s pay or going to work sick,” said Gov. Wolf. “It’s time for the General Assembly to stand up for Pennsylvania’s workers and protect the health of all Pennsylvanians.”Paid sick leave can be used to recover from an illness, such as COVID-19, for medical appointments, to care for a family member, or to seek help from abuse or violence.“Pennsylvania workers have waited long enough, and the pandemic has made the need for paid sick leave more urgent,” said Gov. Wolf. “All employees should have healthy and safe workplaces. There are many paid sick and family leave bills in the legislature, and I’m committed to working with the General Assembly to finally get workers the earned leave they deserve.”Enacting a paid sick leave law would help an estimated 400,000 Pennsylvanians, particularly low-wage workers who are forced to work when ill, risking their health and the employees and customers around them. Providing paid sick leave would improve public health and help to prevent more people from getting sick.The governor was joined for a press conference at andculture, a Harrisburg design firm that supports paid sick leave, by Senators Vincent Hughes, Maria Collett and Pam Iovino and Reps. Mike Schlossberg and Steve Malagari.“Working people deserve employer-paid sick leave so they can attend to the health and wellness of themselves or their families when necessary,” said Sen. Vincent Hughes. “Whether we are in a pandemic or conducting business as normal, the lack of paid sick leave is an overwhelming stressor on our low-income workers, our health care system, and public health in general. Employer-paid sick leave is already working in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. The General Assembly must prioritize protecting hundreds of thousands of low-income Pennsylvanians who stand to benefit from adopting paid sick leave across the commonwealth.”“Even before COVID hit, Pennsylvania’s families were in trouble,” said Sen. Maria Collett. “As a prime sponsor of SB 580, the Family Care Act, I was painfully aware that more than 80 percent of hardworking Pennsylvanians had no form of paid leave to care for themselves or a sick loved one without fear of losing their jobs. Over the past few months, we’ve been putting Band-aids on bullet holes to help families and small businesses try to survive. But bigger, systemic changes are required, and I am glad to see Governor Wolf stepping up and supporting programs like paid leave that are both widely supported and long overdue.”Rep. Mike Schlossberg added, “We’ve heard a lot of talk about essential workers in the last six months. Opponents of sick leave will argue that every worker is essential. That’s a perfectly valid argument to make if it’s one backed up with policy. You can’t tell a worker they are essential and then tell them their health is irrelevant.”“No employee should ever have to choose between taking care of a sick family member and keeping their job; and no employer should have to choose between the health of their business and loyalty to their workers,” said Sen. Pam Iovino. “That was true before the pandemic hit, but now, as working families and businesses in my district and across Pennsylvania persevere through this challenge, paid family leave has become an absolute necessity for the health of our families and our economy. I am committed to working with my colleagues on getting a bipartisan bill to Governor Wolf’s desk.”“Paid parental and sick leave provides stability and peace of mind to both businesses and working families, especially at times of uncertainty,” said Rep. Steve Malagari. “Paid leave reduces staff turnover and makes financial sense for businesses. If you truly want to support family values, and if you want to support our economy, then you need to support paid leave for our hardworking families.”Eight states and Washington D.C. have approved legislation to create paid family and medical leave insurance programs. The loss of productivity in the United States economy from illness in the workplace is $160 billion annually, mostly due to employees coming to work while sick, according to the Main Street Alliance. An estimated $1 billion is spent on health care costs due to lack of paid sick days, the Alliance concluded.Today, the governor also announced that the commonwealth’s new paid parental leave policy will take effect Oct. 15. Commonwealth employees will be eligible for up to six weeks of paid parental leave to care for a child after a birth, adoption, or foster care placement. The new policy is separate from any accrued sick or paid time off that the employee may have earned.Expanding opportunities for new parents to spend time with children following a birth, adoption or foster placement helps to build connections and strengthen families, which is critical to health and development.Paternal leave also helps to bridge the gap to child care programs that often require newborns to be at least six weeks old to enroll. If parents have paid family leave, they can spend time with their baby without having to worry about a paycheck. Paid parental leave is also a valuable benefit to attract new employees and encourage experienced employees to return to work and resume their careers following the welcoming of a new child to their family.Ver esta página en español.last_img read more

Clattenburg to referee Southampton

Clattenburg was previously cleared of a complaint by Chelsea that he racially abused their player John Obi Mikel and has since taken charge of games involving the London club. The latest complaint was also dismissed after investigation by PGMOL and the Football Association. An FA statement last month read: “The FA can confirm it received a complaint from Southampton concerning referee Mark Clattenburg and his alleged comments made to their player Adam Lallana. “The FA has given its full consideration to this matter and it is our view that the comments, as disclosed in Southampton’s letter of complaint, do not constitute misconduct under the FA’s rules. “Consequently, the FA will not be taking any further action in relation to this matter and now considers this case to be closed.” Press Association Mark Clattenburg is to referee Southampton’s game at West Ham on Saturday, the first time he will have taken charge of a Saints game since they filed an official complaint against him. The Durham official angered Saints when, during their defeat to Everton on December 29, he told captain Adam Lallana: “You are very different now, since you’ve played for England – you never used to be like this.” The club reported those comments to referees’ governing body PGMOL and insisted it would be difficult for Clattenburg to take charge of their matches in future, but the referee was cleared of any wrongdoing. read more