Tip for NCAA Final Four 1st-timer: ‘It’s going to blow you away’

first_imgJiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback “Man, where do you start? First, it’s understanding the enormity of it, that when you get there, it’s going to blow you away,” Wright said. “And I would even give more advice now in that when we went in ’09, it blew us away, right, so I knew to expect that.”Wright’s Wildcats lost the national semifinals to North Carolina in ’09. In 2016, Villanova beat the Tar Heels for the championship.“The difference in seven years, what they had done to the Final Four and all of the trappings and the murals on the side of buildings of your players, everything had grown so much, I was shocked. Still shocked, even though we had been there before,” Wright said.“Just to understand, don’t feel like you’re not worth it when you get there and you’re blown away. It happens to everybody. And just try to concentrate on the basketball part of it.”Everything about the last month has been new and exciting to Moser and the Ramblers, starting with their Missouri Valley Conference championship and first NCAA appearance for the school since 1985.Nothing has fazed Sister Jean’s team.“So I love that they’re enjoying this,” Moser said. “Now, with that said, times it by about 100 with the Final Four hoopla, and I get that. I’m going to let them enjoy the ride, and when we’re in film, when we’re in practice, when we’re in walk-throughs in the ball room, everything is going to be as normal, as focused and about what we do. These guys are mature enough to handle it, and that’s all I can do. I mean, you can’t simulate what’s about to happen. They’ve got to go through it, and I want them to go through it.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ In Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery LATEST STORIES With Majerus gone, Moser has tried to channel him through mutual friends and admirers, such as former University of Utah player and Saint Louis assistant coach Alex Jensen.“I worked with Al Jensen, who’s now at the Utah Jazz, and we were texting each other and going to have a conversation, and we were talking about a couple things Coach Majerus was doing,” Moser said. “But I definitely am in the school of thought, it is my first time, and if I can get any advice or anything, I’ll take it all in and then mix it to what we do.”Beilein said what sets Final Four weekend apart is the time demands, including media obligations.“It’s our duty as college basketball teams and (for) fans to satisfy those requests. But it is, it’s a lot of the same questions over and over and over and over again, and you’ve just got to do it and do it the right way,” Beilein said. “Do not get frustrated by it because you will have enough time to plan if you plan your day right.”Along those same lines, Wright said the grandness of the whole thing can be overwhelming.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “I wish Coach (Rick) Majerus was around,” Moser said. “Obviously I was so close to him, and, ironically, it was 20 years ago almost to the date that he was in San Antonio with his Utah team. I wish I could tap into that.”Moser will be the only coach in the national semifinals in San Antonio this weekend who has not previously taken his team to a Final Four. Michigan coach John Beilein, whose team will face Moser’s 11th-seeded Ramblers in Saturday’s first game, is making his second Final Four appearance with the Wolverines. Michigan lost the NCAA championship game in 2013 to Louisville.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownOn the other side of the bracket, both Villanova’s Jay Wright and Kansas’ Bill Self are leading their teams to the Final Four for a third time. Each has won a title.The 49-year-old Moser worked as an assistant for the late Majerus at Saint Louis for four seasons in between a stint as Illinois State head coach and taking the Loyola job in 2011. Majerus, who died in 2012, took Utah to the Final Four in 1998, losing to Kentucky in the title game. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award John Wall practices again but not sure when he’ll play Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew View comments Loyola-Chicago’s Lucas Williamson, Nick Dinardi and Loyola-Chicago Christian Negron, from left, celebrate winning a regional final NCAA college basketball tournament game against Kansas State, Saturday, March 24, 2018, in Atlanta. Loyola-Chicago won 78-62. (AP Photo/David Goldman)A big believer in asking for advice, Loyola-Chicago coach Porter Moser is in the process of tapping into his friends and associates in search of a few Final Four hacks.Moser did not want to reveal during a teleconference Monday with reporters to whom he was turning for tips. He did mention one person he would have liked to have been able to connect with during the last phase of the Ramblers’ improbable NCAA Tournament run.ADVERTISEMENT Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victims Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenterslast_img read more

Frackings harmful effect on babies and Afghanistans lost empires

first_img By Roni DenglerDec. 15, 2017 , 3:45 PM Spy satellites are revealing Afghanistan’s lost empiresFor archaeologists, Afghanistan is virtually off-limits for fieldwork. Yet U.S. and Afghan researchers are now finding thousands of never-before-cataloged ancient sites in the country, which for more than a millennium served as a crucial crossroads linking East and West. The discoveries promise to expand scholars’ view of long-vanished empires while giving the battered nation a desperately needed chance to protect its trove of cultural heritage.French president’s climate talent search nabs 18 foreign scientists Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Fracking’s harmful effect on babies and Afghanistan’s lost empires Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe (Left to right): REUTERS/Les Stone; DIGITALGLOBE, INC.; Andreas März/Flickr (CC BY 2.0) Email French President Emmanuel Macron’s effort to lure disgruntled foreign climate scientists to France—especially from the United States—has produced its first harvest. France announced Monday that Macron’s “Make Our Planet Great Again” initiative has recruited its first class of 18 scientists. Of the new recruits, 13, including a few French nationals, now work in the United States; the others are based in Canada, India, and Europe.Fracking linked to low-weight babiesFracking—the hydraulic fracturing of deeply buried shale rock to extract natural gas—has transformed the United States over the past 15 years, boosting energy stocks, cutting pollution from conventional coal-power plants, and creating new jobs. But this boom may have come at the cost of infant health, according to the first large-scale study of babies born before and after natural gas extraction began in Pennsylvania.99-million-year-old ticks sucked the blood of dinosaursTicks may be a disease-carrying menace for hikers and pets, but they’re also masters of survival: The parasites were sucking the blood of dinosaurs 99 million years ago, according to a set of newly analyzed amber fossils from Myanmar. One of the samples, in which a tick is hanging onto a dino feather, provides the oldest direct evidence of what these ancient parasites ate.Why some clownfish are boringSome clownfish are social and frisky, but others live placid and uneventful lives. To find out why, scientists observed two related species that lived in either sheltered lagoons or harsh, exposed reefs. Despite their sedate surroundings, the lagoon-dwellers were braver and more aggressive toward other fish, whereas the reef fish didn’t seem to have any obvious personality traits. Harsher conditions force the reef fish to adapt to their surroundings, reasoned the researchers, and the constant adaptations prevent distinct personalities from emerging.last_img read more