Barcelona says Neymar wants to leave club amid PSG rumors

first_imgKawhi Leonard, Clippers rally to beat Pelicans Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ #MambaThick: Kobe posts ‘dad-bod’ pic, deletes it soon after LeBron James scores 31 points, Lakers beat Rockets His transfer from Brazilian club Santos in 2013 became the source of a legal dispute that has dogged Barcelona even since. Barcelona said at the time that his transfer cost 57 million euros, while an investigative judge says that the real cost was at least 83.3 million euros.Now Bartomeu and predecessor Sandro Rosell, who resigned as president of the club amid the transfer scandal, are facing trial on charges of fraudulent administration.Neymar has also mixed his flair for fancy goals with bouts of immaturity on the field, often needlessly taunting defenders and trying to upstage them with his dribbling skills.But nobody doubts Neymar is one of the greatest talents of his generation.PSG saw it first-hand in last season’s Champions League. In his most memorable performance at Camp Nou, Neymar scored two goals and set up two more to lead Barcelona to a 6-1 rout to overturn PSG’s 4-0 first-leg win in the last 16.Unless PSG gets last-second jitters, Neymar will take over a team that is searching for a leader who can achieve elusive Champions League success.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next ‘I’m out!’: PewDiePie releases last video before taking break from YouTube LATEST STORIES McGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC return View comments End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend MOST READ Indian national gunned down in Camarines Sur FC Barcelona’s Neymar arrives at the Sports Center FC Barcelona Joan Gamper in Sant Joan Despi, Spain, Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017. Neymar has arrived at Barcelona’s training grounds amid widespread rumors that the Brazil striker could make a record-breaking move to Paris Saint-Germain. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)SANT JOAN DESPI, Spain — Neymar has told Barcelona that he plans to leave the club, with a blockbuster move to Paris Saint-Germain seemingly imminent.The club said Wednesday that the Brazil striker told his teammates “that he had the intention of leaving the club and seeking his future elsewhere, and the coach has given him permission to leave training.”ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Last year, Neymar signed a new contract with Barcelona that tied him to the Catalan club through 2021.Both Barcelona club president Josep Bartomeu and Spanish league president Javier Tebas have said they will consider filing a complaint to UEFA if they think the PSG transfer violates financial fair play rules.With his lightning-quick feet, creative instincts and scoring touch, Neymar helped maintain Barcelona as one of the top clubs in Europe for the past four seasons as he blossomed into a worldwide star.He teamed up with Lionel Messi and Luis Saurez to make an almost unstoppable attack. Neymar scored 105 goals — some of them true gems — and was a key playmaker for Barcelona as it won a Champions League, two Spanish leagues, three Copa del Reys, one Club World Cup, a UEFA Super Cup and two Spanish Super Cups.Yet, even before this drawn-out saga, Neymar also provided more than one headache for his club.ADVERTISEMENT PSG is rumored to be ready to pay his release clause of 222 million euros ($262 million). That would dwarf the 105 million euros (then $116 million) that Manchester United paid for France midfielder Paul Pogba last year.Barcelona said Neymar did not specify where he wants to play next, but the only club speculated to be after him — and one of few which could handle the cost of the transfer — is the Qatari-owned PSG.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’PSG did not answer messages from The Associated Press seeking comment.Barcelona said Neymar left the training ground 30 minutes after arriving on Wednesday. He had arrived to Spain on Tuesday night after holding publicity events for both his personal brand and Barcelona in China. OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respitelast_img read more

GAA: KILCAR GAA CLUB NEWS

first_imgCill Chartha Notes 24.04.2012.The Bingo Jackpot will be €1,050 on 45 numbers next Sunday night as there was no winner this week. . Some of winners were; Michelle McBrearty €95, Letty Doherty €70, Marie Cunningham €70, Jenny Gallagher €70, Carmel McGinley€70, Patricia O’Gara €125, Patricia Cunningham €120, Ann Breslin €200. The LOTTO Jackpot this week will be €2200 as it was not won last week. The winning numbers were 5,11,20,22. Drawn prizes were €50 – Frank McGee,Ardara. €30 – Aine Cunningham,Malinmore. €20 – Ella Carr,Meenacannon. Lotto sellers this weekend-Sat 28th/29th April : Seamus Cunningham,Stephen O’Donnell,Mark Sweeney, Pauric Carr,. Sunday sellers are: John O’Donnell and Francis Byrne. Items for submission to the Club notes as well as match reports can be forwarded to Trevor the PRO on (086) 3333320, no later than Monday evening. Senior and Reserve Teams play Glenswilly away this Sunday in their league fixtures, and your support at this game will be much appreciated. C.L.G. Chill Chartha would like to ask supporter to submitt GAA photos to club officers for use on the new Club website which will be launching in the next two weeks.GAA: KILCAR GAA CLUB NEWS was last modified: April 24th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:GAA: KILCAR GAA CLUB NEWSlast_img read more

Updated: European neuroscientists revolt against the E.U.’s Human Brain Project

first_img*Update, 11 July, 11:58 a.m.: HBP’s Board of Directors and its Executive Committee have responded to the the open letter in a 4-page statement released yesterday. They say they are “saddened” by the letter and say that cognitive neuroscience will still be a part of the HBP’s Partnering Projects. The statement expresses the hope that HBP will unite the neuroscience, medical, and computing communities.An influential group of European neuroscientists is threatening to boycott the Human Brain Project (HBP), the hugely ambitious plan to map the entire human brain in computer models that is slated to receive up to €1 billion in funding from the European Union and its member countries. An open letter published today that has so far received 213 signatures sharply criticizes the project for having a narrow focus, questions the “quality of the governance,” and calls for a tough review and more independent oversight. Without that, they say they will no longer apply for HBP funding.But Henry Markram of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, who leads the project, says the signatories have trouble accepting the “methodological paradigm shift” toward computer modeling that the project embodies; he adds that many more neuroscientists still support the project.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)HBP is one of two very ambitious brain research projects now going on; the other, a U.S. government initiative called BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies), has “a much better approach,” says Peter Dayan, a computational neuroscientist at University College London who has been critical of HBP from the start and has signed the open letter. For BRAIN, “they decided what we need to develop are the technologies” for research, such as recording the activity of groups of neurons at a time, rather than trying to simulate the brain in a computer, Dayan says.Markram launched HBP—which grew out of a Swiss project called Blue Brain—as an attempt to model the entire human brain in silico. Some scientists have criticized Blue Brain as a scientific folly and a waste of public money that would sap support from other areas of brain research—although Markram has said they have misunderstood the nature of the project. In January 2013, the European Commission announced that HBP was one of two projects selected to receive up to €1 billion under the Future and Emerging Technologies Flagship Initiatives. The commission will provide half of the money to HBP; the other half is supposed to come from E.U. member states, although it’s unclear whether that support will materialize.The commission’s choice of HBP triggered criticism from scientists. (The other project, on graphene, has been far less controversial.) But Markram had hoped that the award would unite the neuroscience field instead of divide it. “At the moment, everyone is digging in his little corner,” he told Science at the time. “We are asking the whole world of neuroscience to come together.”The opposite has happened. “Many laboratories refused to join the project when it was first submitted because of its focus on an overly narrow approach, leading to a significant risk that it would fail to meet its goals,” says today’s open letter. “The notion that we know enough about the brain to know what we should simulate is crazy, quite frankly,” Dayan says.More researchers became concerned about the project more recently, after HBP submitted a so-called Framework Proposal Agreement for the second round of funding to the European Commission. In it, goals and research areas had been further narrowed, “including the removal of an entire neuroscience subproject and the consequent deletion of 18 additional laboratories,” according to the open letter.The nixed subproject, called Cognitive Architectures and headed by French neuroscientist Stanislas Dehaene, represented all the neuroscience in Europe that isn’t working on a molecular or synaptic level, says Zachary Mainen of the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown in Lisbon, one of the authors of the letter. HBP “is not a democracy, it’s Henry’s game, and you can either be convinced by his arguments or else you can leave,” Mainen says.Markram, however, tells ScienceInsider that canceling the subproject was supported by nine of the 12 HBP board members and that cognitive scientists have had trouble embracing the basic idea behind HBP. “They just want to do the same thing they have been doing, but the HBP is really about … building technology for sharing and integrating data, about providing a common platform for all of neuroscience,” he says. “It’s a methodological paradigm shift, and it’s a very exciting one, but not for everybody who does this sort of traditional individual research in the lab.”The authors of the letter—which include prominent European neuroscientists—say the European Commission must carry out a thorough and independent review of the entire project and its management. “The panel should make binding recommendations concerning the continuation of the HBP as a whole as well as continuation of individual subprojects,” the letter says, and one or more members of the panel should stay on to serve on an external steering committee for HBP..If the commission can’t meet those demands, it should abandon its support for HBP and channel more funding for neuroscience through other channels, such as the European Research Council, which rewards individual investigators. If the commission does not heed their advice, the letter writers “pledge not to apply for HBP partnering projects and will urge our colleagues to join us in this commitment.”Asked for a response, a representative for the European Commission e-mailed ScienceInsider a statement saying “HBP has only been in place for effectively 9 months, and as for every serious scientific endeavour of this scale, the Commission believes that it is too early to draw conclusions on the success or failure of the project.” The commission will do annual reviews of the project “to assess its advances in scientific and technological research, as well as the management and coordination of the flagship,” says the statement; the first review is planned for January 2015.In retrospect, the whole idea of a €1 billion project to support a single goal may have been flawed, Mainen says. “You need to find a moment in scientific history when this works, like sorting out the human genome,” he says. But HBP was chosen because some of the other proposals—there were six in total—were even worse, he says.Markram does not appear to be impressed by the number of signatories; he says he could get thousands of signatures in support of HBP. “What do we do? Go to war with signatures?” he asks. “That’s silly.” Nonetheless, “we will try to be more clear about how people can participate and how we can benefit every single neuroscientist,” Markram says.last_img read more