Forget Dyson this is a Sharkingly good Prime Day deal

first_imgThe Shark’s battery life isn’t bad either – running for up to 30 minutes per charge. The vacuum’s adaptable Flexology wand makes it easy to store and charge when it does run out of battery.For your peace of mind, the Shark comes with five years manufacturer’s warranty and two years manufacturer’s warranty on the battery.This is one of the biggest savings on vacuums we’ve seen this Prime Day so it really shouldn’t pass you by. The Shark is £200 off – that’s half price for a vacuum with dedicated anti-allergen and pet hair removal technology.BUY NOW: Shark IF130UKTH Cordless Vacuum Cleaner for £199.99 (Save £200) at Amazon We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend. We use industry standard tests to evaluate products in order to assess them properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. Trusted Reviews may get a commission if you buy through our links. Tell us what you think. The Shark IF130UKTH offers you a wide range of features for tackling all the cleaning challenges of any household. A big selling point of the Shark is its anti-allergen technology. The Shark aims to capture 99.9% of dust and allergens within the vacuum when cleaning – keeping them from being breathed in by allergy sufferers.This model is one of Shark’s DuoClean editions of its vacuum range. DuoClean means this Shark is ideal for both carpets and hard floors – letting you move from one surface to the other seamlessly.The vacuum also comes with a TruePet hair removal tool. The tool transforms the vacuum into a device perfect for ridding sofas, stairs, ceilings and even cars of pesky pet hairs. Shark Cordless Vacuum DealShark IF130UKTH Anti-Allergen Cordless Stick Single Battery Vacuum Cleaner, PurpleThis Shark Cordless Vacuum Cleaner is a great all-rounder for tidying up your home. It’s also specifically designed for allergy sufferers.Amazon|Save 50%|Now £199.99View DealNow £199.99|Save 50%|Amazon Prime Day Shark-er! The Shark IF130UKTH Anti-Allergen Cordless Stick Single Battery Vacuum Cleaner is half price – an absolutely whopping £200 off.BUY NOW: Shark IF130UKTH Cordless Vacuum Cleaner for £199.99 (Save £200) at AmazonThis Shark cordless vacuum cleaner has never gotten down to this low low price ever before and – with less than 10 hours of Prime Day left – you really can’t sleep on this deal. Non-Prime members will have to shell out £357.45 today if they want this Shark vacuum today. Shark Cordless Vacuum DealShark IF130UKTH Anti-Allergen Cordless Stick Single Battery Vacuum Cleaner, PurpleThis Shark Cordless Vacuum Cleaner is a great all-rounder for tidying up your home. It’s also specifically designed for allergy sufferers.Amazon|Save 50%|Now £199.99View DealNow £199.99|Save 50%|Amazon Amazon Prime Day Deals This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. ——————————————————————————————————–Grab these great Prime Day savingsSave £40 on the Kindle Paperwhite£160 off the Dell Inspiron 14 Chromebook Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time.last_img read more

US government shutdown will have cost America 12 billion by tomorrow

first_img Comment A sign is displayed on a government building that is closed because of a U.S. government shutdown in Washington.Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images U.S. government shutdown will have cost America $1.2 billion by tomorrow Trump stands firm on wall project as 800,000 government workers struggle with loss of pay Share this storyU.S. government shutdown will have cost America $1.2 billion by tomorrow Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Twitter Reddit More Sponsored By: Ben Riley-Smith, U.S. Editor What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Facebook Email Recommended For YouFrench regulator to EDF: don’t assume new reactor model is accident-proofMexican Energy Minister says planned Dos Bocas refinery project is irreversibleICE Futures Canada quotes and cash pricesWall Street rises as Fed’s Williams bolsters rate-cut hopesMexican Energy Minister says planned Dos Bocas refinery project is irreversible ← Previous Next → 0 Comments The shutdown began at midnight on Friday and shows little sign of ending as the one-week mark approaches. The departments of Homeland Security, Justice and Transportation are among those impacted.Some 800,000 government workers are affected. While some of them continue to work, many will not get paid until the shutdown ends, impacting cash flows for scores of Americans.Some have taken to social media to post about how it is affecting them with the hashtag “#shutdownstories”, including voicing concerns over substantial bills that soon need paying.At the heart of the shutdown, which sees affected government agencies and departments close their doors, is Donald Trump’s insistence on new funding for his U.S.-Mexico border wall.Trump has said that he will not approve any new spending bill, which first needs to be agreed by the US Congress, unless it includes US$5 billion of border wall spending.With the Democrats fiercely against the move and soon to take over the House of Representatives, a deal looks tricky. Trump doubled down on his demand on Christmas Day when asked when government would fully reopen.“I can’t tell you when the government’s going to be open. I can tell you it’s not going to be open until we have a wall or fence, whatever they’d like to call it,” Trump said, referring to Democrats against the border wall.“I’ll call it whatever they want, but it’s all the same thing,” he told reporters after a holiday video conference call with representatives from all five branches of the military stationed in Alaska, Bahrain, Guam and Qatar.Trump argued that drug flows and human trafficking can only be stopped by a wall. “We can’t do it without a wall,” he said. “The only way you’re going to do it is to have a physical barrier, meaning a wall. And if you don’t have that then we’re just not opening [government].”Democrats have questioned the wisdom of spending money on a border wall, preferring to agree to improve fencing, technology and other border control measures.John Deal, a Nasa contractor in Virginia, was one of those affected. He told The Guardian that his son’s tuition fees were due in four weeks. “I budget ahead of time for Christmas and have saved for my son’s college tuition,” Deal said. “The shutdown burden for my family is more [of a] concern for my [family’s] living expense in the near future.” Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images December 27, 20189:44 AM ESTLast UpdatedDecember 27, 201810:02 AM EST Filed under News Economy The Telegraph Featured Stories advertisement The U.S. economy will take a billion-dollar hit if the government shutdown continues until the weekend, experts have predicted as Donald Trump showed no sign of backing down.Some 25 per cent of the federal government is without funding after the U.S. Congress and the president failed to approve a new spending package.Standard & Poor’s, the credit rating firm, estimated the shutdown would shave US$1.2 billion off America’s gross domestic product [GDP] every week.Litter spills out of a public dustbin next to the Washington Monument on the National Mall in Washington during a partial government shutdown. Join the conversation →last_img read more

Koben Announces EVOLVE EVSF —GridFriendly Modular EV Store Forward System

first_imgKoben Systems Inc. Announces EVOLVE EVSF the World’s First Scalable EV Charging Battery Storage Solution for MURB, MUD and Workplace EV Charging Koben* announces EVOLVE EVSF (TM), an integrated system…The post Koben Announces EVOLVE EVSF —Grid-Friendly Modular EV Store & Forward System appeared first on EV Obsession. Source: EV Obsession RSS Feedlast_img

Tesla Semi is not scaring Daimler CEO throws cold water and says

first_imgThere’s currently a race to bring electric trucks to market and change the economics in the trucking industry while removing its reliance on fossil fuels.Tesla has the most aggressive plan to electrify the market with the Tesla Semi, but Daimler Trucks, one of the largest incumbents, is not worried about it.The CEO throws some cold water on Tesla’s electric truck project and says that Daimler will come out on top. more…The post Tesla Semi is not scaring Daimler, CEO throws cold water and says they will dominate electric trucks appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more

Elon Musk Says New Tesla Roadster Will Fly

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News One thing is for certain, if the car will be able to fly, even for a while and just a little above the ground, it will flood YouTube with video reviews and demonstrations some of which will surely end badly.The new Roadster will actually do something like this https://t.co/fIsTAYa4x8— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) January 9, 2019 I believe it can flyElon Musk released a new message “The new Roadster will actually do something like this” with an attached animation of a futuristic (“Back To The Future”) vehicle with some kind of rocket boosters (who needs wheels these days anyway?).It seems that the Rocket Boosters package, hinted at earlier this year, is really coming – at least we should expect some sort of prototype with this thruster package. Whether the rockets will be for acceleration / turning only, or to rise from the ground is an open question that Musk answered in an additional tweet.Tesla Roadster Watch Insane Reactions To Tesla Roadster’s Stupidly Quick Acceleration Musk Tweets – Tesla Roadster To Get Real Rocket Boosters, Might Fly No problem— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) January 9, 2019 Plus, you can basically accelerate at the limit of human endurance— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) January 9, 2019center_img I don’t think the law fully anticipated this situation. So probably yes for a while.— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) January 9, 2019 I’m not. Will use SpaceX cold gas thruster system with ultra high pressure air in a composite over-wrapped pressure vessel in place of the 2 rear seats.— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) January 9, 2019 Tesla Roadster With SpaceX-Inspired Boosters Comes To Life Vertically or horizontally?— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) January 9, 2019 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 9, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Tesla Model 3 Performance vehicles with upgrades tested by prodriver

first_imghttps://youtu.be/a80dwn_R-mcThe post Tesla Model 3 Performance vehicles with upgrades tested by pro-driver appeared first on Electrek. Pro-driver Randy Pobst, a former multiple SCCA World Challenge GT champion who helped Tesla test its ‘Track Mode’, has put several Tesla Model 3 Performance vehicles with different levels of upgrades to the test. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe the podcast. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Stunning century is just start for Strauss says Middlesex mate Gatting

first_imgShare on Messenger Paul Weaver Since you’re here… Share on LinkedIn But he was dropped for the 2007 tour to Sri Lanka and his century in Napier was his first in Tests for 20 months. There was a suspicion that he had been found out, that he was vulnerable to the pitched-up, swinging delivery that could not be pulled or cut, his main strengths. Now, though, as Gatting says: “He can go on from here.”When Strauss joined the Middlesex staff in 1997 he impressed more with his intelligence and determination than his natural talent. His early idol was Justin Langer and he spent many hours working with him when the two were together at Lord’s. Now the England selectors are hoping he will go on to become as good as the Australian, one of the greatest of all self-made batsmen. But with just one success in six innings against a moderate Kiwi side, Strauss still has much to prove. Support The Guardian Share on Twitter Share via Email Share on Facebook Share on WhatsApp Mon 24 Mar 2008 22.27 EDT Sign up to the Spin – our weekly cricket round-up Read more Share on Facebook Shares00 Reuse this content Mike Gatting made his last appearance for Middlesex at Lord’s in September 1998, just one week after Andrew Strauss had made his first-class debut for the county, scoring 83 against Hampshire at Southampton.But even as the former England captain eased into retirement he had seen enough of the new arrival, and he was one of the least surprised of observers as Strauss announced his return to Test form with 177 in Napier.”There was always a feeling of strength about Straussy and no one was very shocked when he made his name with the England team,” he said. “I remember talking about him with Andy Wagner, the old Radley College coach who has developed a number of good players for Middlesex, and we knew we had a good cricketer on our hands.”Gatting, 50, who six months ago took up a new position with the England and Wales Cricket Board, overseeing the first-class and recreational game, added: “I watched Straussy’s innings on TV and it was obvious that he wanted to hang around until his timing and rhythm returned. He didn’t play any silly shots. He made the bowlers bowl at him and didn’t try to be too positive. It was good to see him hitting the ball down the ground and not through extra-cover. I know he’s had a tough time, but most players go through that. Even Kevin Pietersen couldn’t do it every time.”Gatting’s career might be described as the reverse of Strauss’s. Although he was a more talented and complete batsman, Gatting struggled to establish himself in the England team and it took seven years and 54 innings before he scored his first Test century. In contrast Strauss scored 112 and 83 on his debut against New Zealand in 2004 and made another century on his away Test debut, 126 against South Africa at Port Elizabeth during he 2004-05 series. He was man of the series in South Africa with 656 runs at 72.88 and also the Vodafone Cricketer of the Year in 2005. First published on Mon 24 Mar 2008 22.27 EDT Topics Stunning century is just start for Strauss, says Middlesex mate Gatting Cricket Andrew Strauss England in New Zealand 2007-08 Share via Email Sport Share on Pinterest … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Twitter Sportlast_img read more

FCPA Flash – A Conversation With Paul Pelletier

first_imgThe new FCPA Professor contains a new feature – the FCPA Flash podcast.The goal of FCPA Flash is to provide, in an audio format, the same fresh, candid and informed commentary about the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and related topics as readers have come to expect from the written posts on FCPA Professor.This FCPA Flash episode is a conversation with  Paul Pellletier, a former Principal Deputy Chief of the DOJ’s fraud section and currently a member of Mintz Levin. Pelletier has written some excellent recent pieces on the DOJ’s FCPA enforcement program (see here and here) and in the podcast he discusses the long time periods often associated with FCPA inquiries, FCPA investigative costs, and how the DOJ can best allocate its resources to fight bribery.FCPA Flash is sponsored by the Red Flag Group. The Red Flag Group assists companies in developing and maintaining efficient and effective corporate governance and compliance programs, and has a proven track record in providing integrity due diligence investigations in 194 countries.last_img read more

An FCPA Enforcement Action That Slipped Through The Cracks

first_imgThere is not much that goes unnoticed by the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act media.However, this April 19, 2018 indictment of Frank Roberto Chatburn Ripalda (a dual United States and Ecuadorian citizen) appears to have slipped through the cracks.The indictment alleges that between 2013 and 2015, Chatburn conspired with others by making corrupt payments to PetroEcuador officials in order to obtain and retain contracts for Galileo (described as an Ecuadorian company that provided services in the oil and gas industry) from PetroEcuador.PetroEcuador is described as follows:“Empresa Publica de Hidrocarburos de Ecuador (“PetroEcuador”) was the state owned oil company of Ecuador. PetroEcuador was wholly-owned and controlled by the government of Ecuador and performed a function that Ecuador treated as its own, and thus was an “instrumentality” of the Ecuadorian government.”According to the indictment, Chatburn and others “attempted to conceal the bribe payments by using intermediaries, including Intermediary Company [described as an escrow agent formed and registered in the British Virgin Islands with a bank account in the Cayman Islands] and Denfield [described as a Panamanian shell company that Chatburn helped to procure in or about 2012 for the purpose of receiving profits for the beneficial owner of Galileo] to funnel the payments to the PetroEcuador officials, and by helping two PetroEcuador officials set up offshore shell corporations and opening Swiss bank accounts for the purpose of concealing bribe payments the officials received.”The indictment alleges that Chatburn and his co-conspirators “facilitated bribe payments to PetroEcuador officials totaling approximately $3,270,980.” The indictment further alleges that between 2013 and 2016 PetroEcuador paid Galileo approximately $27.8 million on contracts that it obtained and retained through bribes into accountsdesignated by Chatburn.”Chatburn is charged with conspiracy to violate the FCPA’s anti-bribery provisions, a substantive FCPA violation, conspiracy to commit money laundering and a substantive money laundering violation. In addition, in the same indictment Jose Larrea (a U.S. citizen) is charged with conspiracy to commit money laundering.According to documents filed in connection with Chatburn’s bond, he has been aware for over two years that he was under criminal investigation.In May 2016 the SEC found in this administrative order that Chatburn (described as an an investment adviser representative for Biscayne Capital International LLC (BCI) and an investment adviser for the offshore affiliated entities, recommended and sold approximately $3.5 million in proprietary products to 29 non-U.S. BCI clients without making adequate disclosures or investigating red flags regarding the proprietary product issuers. (See here).last_img read more

VE Leads Dynamic Offshore Sale to SandRidge Energy for 13 Billion

first_img Password Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Lost your password? Remember mecenter_img Username Oklahoma City-based SandRidge Energy announced Wednesday that it is paying $1.275 million to acquire Dynamic Offshore Resources, LLC, a private oil and gas company that acquires and develops producing properties in the Gulf of Mexico . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.last_img

Dallas Litigator Leads Big 12 and Conference USA Win over Former StudentAthletes

first_img Lost your password? Password Polsinelli partner Leane Capps scored a huge victory last week for two major college sports conferences when a federal judge in Tennessee rejected claims by 10 former college basketball and football players who argue they deserve compensation for the use of their images and likenesses. Capps represents the two Irvin-based leagues in two separate but very similar cases – one in Tennessee and the second in California. Billions of dollars are at stake in the litigation . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Remember mecenter_img Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Usernamelast_img read more

Elder Susceptibility to Scams Swindles and Fraud

first_imgby, Ronni Bennett, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesA recent report estimates that in 2010, people older than 60 lost $2.9 billion to financial exploitation, a 12 percent increase from 2008. The numbers are undoubtedly much higher than can be counted because due to embarrassment, it is one of the country’s least reported crimes.Most perpetrators are trusted professionals and family members but strangers are responsible too via scams, swindles and fraud. Whatever the source, cheating old people out of their money is growth industry because the number of elders is increasing; crooks believe they have a lot of money; and it is a low-risk crime due to that embarrassment factor.It has bugged me for years that conventional wisdom, along with the FBI and other organizations, assert that elders fall victim to scams more frequently than younger people.Why should they? In fact (thought I), with age comes experience and many elders have probably been burned enough times by unscrupulous people to be more alert to it than those with less experience.It all sounded like a case of ageism to me or at best, that what is not included in elder scam reports is that victims are cognitively impaired to a greater or lesser degree.Now, if two new studies from UCLA are accurate, the FBI is correct about larger numbers of elder scam victims and the reason supports my suspicion of impaired cognition if not in the way I imagined.”Older people, more than younger adults, may fail to interpret an untrustworthy face as potentially dishonest, the study shows.“The reason for this, the UCLA life scientist found, seems to be that a brain region called the anterior insula, which is linked to disgust and is important for discerning untrustworhty faces, is less active in older adults.”As the writer Stuart Wolpert explains, younger and older adults react similarly to faces judged to be trustworthy or neutral. It is with viewing untrustworthy faces that the differences showed up. With the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scans,“In younger adults, the very act of judging whether a person is trustworthy activates the anterior insula,” said Shelley E. Taylor, a distinguished professor of psychology at UCLA and senior author of the new research.“It’s as if they’re thinking they need to make this judgment with caution. This gives us a potential brain mechanism for understanding why older and younger adults process facial cues about trust differently.“Now we know what the brain sees, and in the older adults, the answer is not very much when it comes to differentiating on the basis of trust.“It’s not that younger adults are better at finance or judging whether an investment is good; they’re better at discerning whether a person is potentially trustworthy when cues are communicated visually.”Professor Taylor says the “prototypical victim” is a 55-year-old male who is an experienced investor (although I’ve read elsewhere that an 80-year-old woman is typical). Taylor notes that for her, this study is personal: both her father and her aunt have been victims of financial scams.Here are two images from the study. The young adult brain is on the left, the old adult brain on the right.BrainImageFinalTaylor says that one of the functions of the anterior insula is to sense body feelings and interpret such visceral cues. “This is the response that we see lacking in older adults.”That could be called a kind of cognitive impairment but it’s not the sort I had imagined – of an elder’s day-to-day reasoning deteriorating.So it seems my arrogance was showing in believing that my brain is healthy enough that I could not fall victim to a swindler. Now I know better. We are all vulnerable and these studies are a good warning to be careful.You can read more about all this at the UCLA Newsroom website.Here are some good online resources where you can learn about known scams, swindles and frauds that commonly target elders:The FBI Common Fraud Scheme/Seniors pageThe NCOA Top 10 Scams Targeting SeniorsNOLO Financial Scams Against SeniorsOriginally published at www.TimeGoesBy.netRelated PostsWatching Out for Elder Scams and FraudAs a general rule – no, I take that back. As a hard and fast rule, never, ever fall for anyone offering free anything. A mid-2010 survey by Investor Protection Trust revealed that 7.3 million older Americans – 20 percent of citizens over the age of 65 – had been…Winning the Sweepstakes (And Losing Your Savings)Financial elder abuse is particularly harrowing because older adults do not have a lifetime left to make up the loss through work and investment.Elder Abuse – What is It?You think you know the answer to that, right? Well, not so fast. I did too until I started looking into elder abuse for us. There are a zillion definitions, several kinds of abuse, no useful statistics and differing laws…TweetShareShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

Invasive surgery should be done for select patients with acid reflux says

first_imgMay 8 2018As the number of Americans with acid reflux grows, a study by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus says invasive procedures to treat those who don’t respond to medication should be done for select patients.”When you have a subset of patients who are not responding to drug therapy you need to respond in a thoughtful way,” said the study’s lead author, Rena Yadlapati, MD, MHS, assistant professor of medicine-gastroenterology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “Only a select few should be referred to surgery.”The paper was published recently in The American Journal of Gastroenterology.Currently, about 30 percent of the U.S. population suffers from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and most are treated with drugs like Nexium known as a proton pump inhibitors. Yet for 10-40 percent of patients, medication doesn’t eliminate symptoms. And for some, a hypersensitivity to symptoms may lead them to believe their acid reflux is worse than it is.Yadlapati and her colleagues surveyed a panel of 14 gastroenterologists on treatment options when typical acid reflux drugs don’t work. They constructed a number of hypothetical scenarios involving patients who did not respond to double dose proton pump inhibitors.”A nuanced understanding of both the literature and the patient’s unique physiologic profile is critical to appropriate decision-making, as inappropriate recommendations may compromise outcomes and patient safety,” Yadlapati said.The panel investigated each hypothetical case and ranked the appropriateness of four invasive anti-reflux options. They also ranked their preference for drug and behavioral health treatment options.Related StoriesArtificial DNA can help release active ingredients from drugs in sequenceStimulated seizures help treat epilepsy faster, betterPersonalizing Nutritional Medicine With the Power of NMR”In the majority of cases, an invasive anti-reflux intervention was ranked as an inappropriate option,” the study said.For patients with true refractory acid reflux demonstrated by ongoing abnormal esophageal acid exposure despite proton pump inhibitors more invasive options were recommended like laparoscopic fundoplication, where part of the stomach is wrapped around the lower end of the esophagus and stitched into place.The researchers found that some patients who didn’t respond to acid reflux drugs had a hypersensitivity to the symptoms. In these cases, Yadlapati said, invasive procedures are unlikely to improve outcomes while possibly increasing morbidity, decreasing quality of life and adding up to higher health-care costs.She said low-doses of antidepressants have a role in modulating symptoms.”Behavioral modification and relaxation therapy are also potentially effective,” she said. “In a study of nine patients with functional heartburn, esophageal-directed hypnotherapy was associated with significant improvements in symptoms, visceral anxiety and quality of life.”Ultimately, Yadlapati said, treatment options should be personalized for each patient. Surgery may be called for in some cases but it’s not usually the preferred option.”We are not opposed to surgery for the right patients,” she said. “But we should not be reflexively referring patients for these invasive treatments before considering all of the options.”Source: http://www.ucdenver.edu/last_img read more

New study provides important insights on mosquitoes that spread disease

first_img Source:http://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/medical-and-veterinary-entomology/new-insights-mosquitoes-spread-disease Jul 9 2018The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is a highly invasive species and a vector of multiple pathogens including various viruses, such as chikungunya, dengue, and Zika. A new Medical and Veterinary Entomology study that evaluated the relationship between the mosquito’s presence and habitat variables at a small scale provides important information for planning effective prevention and control campaigns.Related StoriesNew study suggests bacteria-loaded mosquitoes may halt spread of Dengue feverNitrogen-rich diet reduces mosquitoes’ ability to transmit ZikaWar against mosquitoes saves lives and money in Sri LankaWhen investigators examined mosquito populations on Mallorca Island off the coast of Spain, they found that Ae. Albopictuspresence was negatively associated with altitude, probably due to greater human presence at low altitudes near the coast. Moreover, Ae. albopictus presence was positively associated with the extent of freshwater surface (mainly swimming pools), due to nearby gardens, plants, and freshwater sources. The researchers combined these two variables to predict the presence of the species on the entire island at a small scale.”Given the widespread presence of Asian tiger mosquito on Mallorca Island and its association with human activities, the removal of potential breeding sites by citizen intervention will be essential to improve species control,” said lead author Dr. Ana Sanz-Aguilar, of IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB), in Spain.​last_img read more

Differences in mouth bacteria of HIVinfected youth may increase risk of cavities

first_imgJul 11 2018A team of scientists from The Forsyth Institute, a global leader in oral health research, in collaboration with the NIH-funded Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS), has published the results of a new study indicating that differences in the mouth bacteria of youth born with HIV may increase their risk of cavities. The researchers found that HIV-infected youth, compared with uninfected youth, had lower numbers of Corynebacterium, a microbe that is abundant in dental plaque of healthy individuals.”At the Forsyth Institute, we encourage our scientists to explore the unknown and equip them with the resources and partnerships to do so,” said Dr. Wenyuan Shi, CEO and Chief Scientific Officer at the Forsyth Institute. “This group of researchers did exactly that. When there was limited information on the potential role of oral bacteria in HIV-infected youth, they spearheaded a study to fill in these research gaps and understand more globally how systemic diseases, or their treatment, may affect the microbes that help keep us healthy or cause disease.”Related StoriesScripps CHAVD wins $129 million NIH grant to advance new HIV vaccine approachEven when HIV prevention drug is covered, other costs block treatmentHIV DNA persists in spinal fluid despite treatment, linked to cognitive impairmentThe researchers followed two groups of youth: those born with HIV and a comparison group of youth born to HIV-infected mothers who were not infected. The youth were enrolled in the PHACS AMP study, which investigates the long-term outcomes of HIV infection and its treatment among children who acquired HIV from their mothers. This research demonstrated that bacterial composition was similar in both testing groups, implying that pediatric HIV infection, and its treatment, are not causing large-scale imbalances in the bacteria found in dental plaque. The HIV-infected youth, however, had fewer corynebacteria in their dental plaque. This type of bacterium can help prevent the lactic acid produced by cavity-causing bacteria from reaching healthy teeth, which may help protect teeth from dental decay. Thus, the lower amounts of corynebacteria may explain why the HIV-positive youth also had more cavities.”This is critical information, as we are now beginning to have a better understanding of the potential role of the oral microbiome in youth born with HIV. It is exciting to think that these bacteria could be involved in protecting teeth from cavities–this may guide us in developing new therapies to prevent dental decay in these youth,” said Dr. Bruce Paster, Senior Member of Staff at The Forsyth Institute and Professor in Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine.The research team hopes to take this study one step further, comparing the oral microbiome of the two groups in this study with HIV-negative youth who have never been exposed to HIV. This will help researchers understand the role of HIV exposure in determining the makeup of the oral microbiome. Additionally, the research will help reveal how species such as Corynebacterium might keep some oral diseases at bay with the ultimate goal of understanding treatment, risk assessment and prevention in HIV-infected youth.Source: https://www.forsyth.org/news/forsyth-institute-discovers-differences-oral-microbiome-youth-born-hiv#.W0XVl9UzbIVlast_img read more

Chinas belt and road infrastructure plan also includes science

first_img Lommes/Wikimedia Commons Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Dennis NormileMay. 16, 2017 , 12:00 PMcenter_img China’s plans for stronger land (black) and sea (blue) trade routes also include funding for scientific cooperation. China’s belt and road infrastructure plan also includes science China’s plan to make massive investments in land and sea links with global trading partners also includes a little noticed commitment to support science and engineering, including the creation of dozens of new laboratories.The belt and road initiative—originally announced in fall 2013 and officially dubbed the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st-Century Maritime Silk Road—is primarily an economic development program. Chinese President Xi Jinping’s pet project, it is heavy on infrastructure—calling for new roads, railways, bridges, and ports—to recreate the overland and maritime trade routes that once led to China. Nearly 70 nations have agreed to cooperate in the plan, which aims to foster industrial development not only in the developing nations of Asia and Africa, but also in China’s western provinces, which have yet to share in the economic prosperity of the country’s coastal regions.China is also planning to use the initiative to flex its scientific and engineering muscles, officials made clear at a 2-day Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation that ended yesterday in Beijing. “Innovation is an important force powering development,” Xi said in a speech to the opening session of the forum. And so the initiative will include technical cooperation in fields including artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, quantum computing, and smart cities. He also mentioned the need to pursue economic growth that is in line with sustainable development goals, and that rests on environmentally friendly approaches. A science and technology action plan calls for training 5000 foreign scientists, engineers, and managers over the next 5 years, as well as welcoming younger scientists to China on short-term research visits. (That pledge comes on top of a separate program that each year provides 10,000 scholarships to students from developing countries to study in China.) The initiative also calls for setting up 50 joint laboratories, though the research fields and other details are not yet specified. And Xi wants to create a big data service platform on environmental protection, and promises support for countries adapting to climate change.The Beijing-based Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) is on board with the effort. A year ago it formed a Digital Silk Road program that will bring together scientists from 40 countries to cooperate on space-based Earth observations that might help identify and manage natural resources, protect the environment, and prepare for and respond to disasters. And last fall, the academy organized an international symposium that pulled together 50 countries from along the trade routes to explore further opportunities for cooperation. CAS sees the belt and road effort as China “shouldering more international responsibility,” academy President Bai Chunli said in a statement prior to the summit.So far, China has committed some $1 trillion to the belt and road initiative, which will unfold over many years.last_img read more

Watch the secret to a tunas sharp turns

first_img By Kai SinclairJul. 20, 2017 , 2:00 PM Watch the secret to a tuna’s sharp turns Bluefin tuna can stretch 3 meters, weigh a metric ton, and reach speeds of 60 kilometers per hour. Yet they still turn on a dime when hunting, thanks in part to their lymphatic systems. Unlike humans, who use their lymphatic systems to produce and transport white blood cells, tuna use theirs to move two of their fins, researchers report today in Science. When scientists dissected the nimble fish, they discovered empty cavities at the base of their second dorsal and under-belly fins. These vascular sinuses are connected to a network of vessels that extend into the fin, between the bones that make up the fins’ rays. When the team pumped a saline solution into the vascular sinuses of recently deceased tuna, the solution flowed into the vascular channels and increased the fins’ internal pressure. This caused the fins to rise and stand erect from the body. The fish make such changes in their fin position when they make a series of sharp turns, especially during hunting, the team found. The researchers suspect that this fin movement offers extra stability during tuna’s tight maneuvers so the fish don’t have to sacrifice their speed for balance.last_img read more

Frackings harmful effect on babies and Afghanistans lost empires

first_img By Roni DenglerDec. 15, 2017 , 3:45 PM Spy satellites are revealing Afghanistan’s lost empiresFor archaeologists, Afghanistan is virtually off-limits for fieldwork. Yet U.S. and Afghan researchers are now finding thousands of never-before-cataloged ancient sites in the country, which for more than a millennium served as a crucial crossroads linking East and West. The discoveries promise to expand scholars’ view of long-vanished empires while giving the battered nation a desperately needed chance to protect its trove of cultural heritage.French president’s climate talent search nabs 18 foreign scientists Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Fracking’s harmful effect on babies and Afghanistan’s lost empires Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe (Left to right): REUTERS/Les Stone; DIGITALGLOBE, INC.; Andreas März/Flickr (CC BY 2.0) Email French President Emmanuel Macron’s effort to lure disgruntled foreign climate scientists to France—especially from the United States—has produced its first harvest. France announced Monday that Macron’s “Make Our Planet Great Again” initiative has recruited its first class of 18 scientists. Of the new recruits, 13, including a few French nationals, now work in the United States; the others are based in Canada, India, and Europe.Fracking linked to low-weight babiesFracking—the hydraulic fracturing of deeply buried shale rock to extract natural gas—has transformed the United States over the past 15 years, boosting energy stocks, cutting pollution from conventional coal-power plants, and creating new jobs. But this boom may have come at the cost of infant health, according to the first large-scale study of babies born before and after natural gas extraction began in Pennsylvania.99-million-year-old ticks sucked the blood of dinosaursTicks may be a disease-carrying menace for hikers and pets, but they’re also masters of survival: The parasites were sucking the blood of dinosaurs 99 million years ago, according to a set of newly analyzed amber fossils from Myanmar. One of the samples, in which a tick is hanging onto a dino feather, provides the oldest direct evidence of what these ancient parasites ate.Why some clownfish are boringSome clownfish are social and frisky, but others live placid and uneventful lives. To find out why, scientists observed two related species that lived in either sheltered lagoons or harsh, exposed reefs. Despite their sedate surroundings, the lagoon-dwellers were braver and more aggressive toward other fish, whereas the reef fish didn’t seem to have any obvious personality traits. Harsher conditions force the reef fish to adapt to their surroundings, reasoned the researchers, and the constant adaptations prevent distinct personalities from emerging.last_img read more

How long is Saturns day Search reveals an even deeper mystery

first_img For decades, researchers have puzzled over a seemingly simple mystery: the length of a day on Saturn. Unlike the rocky planets of the inner solar system, whose rotations are measured by simply tracking objects on their spinning surfaces, the fixed interiors of planets like Jupiter and Saturn are veiled by ever-shifting flows of gas.To get around this problem, scientists have turned to distinctive radio waves created by each planet’s magnetic field. On Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune, the axis of the magnetic field is offset against the planet’s rotation; as the two axes wobble around each other, a predictable pattern of radio waves is generated, pegged to the start of each day.On Saturn, however, the two axes are almost perfectly aligned, leading to inconclusive results. In the early 1980s, the Voyager spacecraft estimated Saturn’s day at 10 hours, 39 minutes; when the Cassini spacecraft arrived more than a decade ago, its estimate was 10 hours, 45 minutes—and the number kept changing. Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Last year, as Cassini made its grand finale, diving between Saturn and its rings (and ultimately vaporizing into the planet), researchers hoped new measures of the planet’s magnetic field might finally resolve the mystery. Such a close-up view, they hoped, would allow them to detangle signals that stemmed from the planet’s atmosphere versus those generated by its dense interior layer of metallic hydrogen, thought to be the source of its magnetic field.But Saturn, it seems, had other plans. In new work published today in Science, the Cassini team disclosed the finest measures yet of Saturn’s magnetic field, revealing its two axes are offset by less than a measly 0.0095°, with the exact offset still unknown. The extreme alignment has, so far, not allowed a finer measure of the planet’s day. But it also points toward a deeper mystery: Planetary dynamos, which generate magnetic fields, typically require an offset between these two axes to continue. Given this nearly perfect symmetry, then, how does Saturn have a magnetic field at all? By Paul VoosenOct. 4, 2018 , 2:00 PMcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) How long is Saturn’s day? Search reveals an even deeper mysterylast_img read more

Missions expose surprising differences in the interiors of Saturn and Jupiter

first_imgMaterial thousands of kilometers below the clouds of Jupiter and Saturn tugs subtly on orbiting spacecraft, revealing hidden structure and motions. 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img By Paul VoosenJan. 17, 2019 , 2:00 PM A clever use of radio signals from planetary spacecraft is allowing researchers to pierce the swirling clouds that hide the interiors of Jupiter and Saturn, where crushing pressure transforms matter into states unknown on Earth. The effort, led by Luciano Iess of Sapienza University in Rome, turned signals from two NASA probes, Cassini at Saturn and Juno at Jupiter, into probes of gravitational variations that originate deep inside these gas giants.What the researchers have found is fueling a high-stakes game of compare and contrast. The results, published last year in Nature for Jupiter and this week in Science for Saturn, show that “the two planets are more complex than we thought,” says Ravit Helled, a planetary scientist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. “Giant planets are not simple balls of hydrogen and helium.”In the 1980s, Iess helped pioneer a radio instrument for Cassini that delivered an exceptionally clear signal because it worked in the Ka band, which is relatively free of noise from interplanetary plasma. By monitoring fluctuations in the signal, the team planned to search for gravitational waves from the cosmos and test general relativity during the spacecraft’s journey to Saturn, which began in 1997. Iess’s group put a similar device on Juno, which launched in 2011, but this time the aim was to study Jupiter’s interior. Missions expose surprising differences in the interiors of Saturn and Jupiter Juno skims close to Jupiter’s surface every 53 days, and with each pass hidden influences inside the planet exert a minute pull on the spacecraft, resulting in tiny Doppler shifts in its radio signals. Initially, Iess and his team thought measuring those shifts wouldn’t be feasible at Saturn because of the gravitational influence of its rings. But that obstacle disappeared earlier this decade, after the Cassini team decided to end the mission by sending the craft on a series of orbits, dubbed the Grand Finale, that dipped below the rings and eliminated their effects. As a result, Iess and colleagues could use radio fluctuations to map the shape of gravity fields at both planets, allowing them to infer the density and movements of material deep inside.One goal was to probe the roots of the powerful winds that whip clouds on the gas giants into distinct horizontal bands. Scientists assumed the winds would either be shallow, like winds on Earth, or very deep, penetrating tens of thousands of kilometers into the planets, where extreme pressure is expected to rip the electrons from hydrogen, turning it into a metallike conductor. The results for Jupiter were a puzzle: The 500-kilometer-per-hour winds aren’t shallow, but they reach just 3000 kilometers into the planet, some 4% of its radius. Saturn then delivered a different mystery: Despite its smaller volume, its surface winds, which top out at 1800 kilometers per hour, go three times deeper, to at least 9000 kilometers. “Everybody was caught by surprise,” Iess says.Scientists think the explanation for both findings lies in the planets’ deep magnetic fields. At pressures of about 100,000 times that of Earth’s atmosphere—well short of those that create metallic hydrogen—hydrogen partially ionizes, turning it into a semiconductor. That allows the magnetic field to control the movement of the material, preventing it from crossing the field lines. “The magnetic field freezes the flow,” and the planet becomes rigid, says Yohai Kaspi, a planetary scientist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, who worked with Iess. Jupiter has three times Saturn’s mass, which causes a far more rapid increase in atmospheric pressure—about three times faster. “It’s basically the same result,” says Kaspi, but the rigidity sets in at a shallower depth.The Juno and Cassini data yield only faint clues about greater depths. Scientists once believed the gas giants formed much like Earth, building up a rocky core before vacuuming gas from the protoplanetary disc. Such a stately process would have likely led to distinct layers, including a discrete core enriched in heavier elements. But Juno’s measurements, interpreted through models, suggested Jupiter’s core has only a fuzzy boundary, its heavy elements tapering off for up to half its radius. This suggests that rather than forming a rocky core and then adding gas, Jupiter might have taken shape from vaporized rock and gas right from the start, says Nadine Nettelmann, a planetary scientist at the University of Rostock in Germany.The picture is still murkier for Saturn. Cassini data hint that its core could have a mass of some 15 to 18 times that of Earth, with a higher concentration of heavy elements than Jupiter’s, which could suggest a clearer boundary. But that interpretation is tentative, says David Stevenson, a planetary scientist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena and a co-investigator on Juno. What’s more, Cassini was tugged by something deep within Saturn that could not be explained by the winds, Iess says. “We call it the dark side of Saturn’s gravity.” Whatever is causing this tug, Stevenson adds, it’s not found on Jupiter. “It is a major result. I don’t think we understand it yet.”Because Cassini’s mission ended with the Grand Finale, which culminated with the probe’s destruction in Saturn’s atmosphere, “There’s not going to be a better measurement anytime soon,” says Chris Mankovich, a planetary scientist at the University of California, Santa Cruz. But although the rings complicated the gravity measurements, they also offer an opportunity. For some unknown reason—perhaps its winds, perhaps the pull of its many moons—Saturn vibrates. The gravitational influence of those oscillations minutely warps the shape of its rings into a pattern like the spiraling arms of a galaxy. The result is a visible record of the vibrations, like the trace on a seismograph, which scientists can decipher to plumb the planet. Mankovich says it’s clear that some of these vibrations reach the deep interior, and he has already used “ring seismology” to estimate how fast Saturn’s interior rotates.Cassini’s last gift may be to show how fortunate scientists are to have the rings as probes. Data from the spacecraft’s final orbits enabled Iess’s team to show the rings are low in mass, which means they must be young, as little as 10 million years old—otherwise, encroaching interplanetary soot would have darkened them. They continue to rain material onto Saturn, the Cassini team has found, which could one day lead to their demise. But for now they stand brilliant against the gas giant, with more stories to tell.last_img read more