WILLIAM SHATNER SCHOOLS CRITICS OF SAMESEX KISS DURING MACYS THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE

first_imgNathan Congleton/NBC Twitter This year’s annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade caused controversy due to a dance number from Broadway musical “The Prom” that featured two women kissing — the first time a same-sex kiss has ever been broadcast during coverage of the family-friendly NYC parade.Naturally, the kiss was deemed to be offensive by right-wing groups such as ForAmerica, which shared their horrified reactions and lamented how children throughout America had been traumatized.Millions of small children just watched two girls kiss and had their innocence broken this morning. @nbc and @Macys just blindsided parents who expected this to be a family program, so they could push their agenda on little kids. #macysthanksgivingdayparade #MacysDayParade pic.twitter.com/EmCLSfNmAj— ForAmerica (@ForAmerica) November 22, 2018 Advertisement Enter William Shatner. A social media powerhouse with a track record for suffering neither fools nor bigots who turn up on his Twitter feed, the 87-year-old Montreal native found himself dragged into the debate.? Really? I’m in the middle of a thread where people are upset that the Macy’s parade featured two women kissing 48 hours ago! ? https://t.co/ndTqwdMCJR— William Shatner (@WilliamShatner) November 24, 2018That offhand remark was met with ire by a Twitter user who took issue with the notion that airing a same-sex kiss on TV is “forward-thinking,” and earned a firm rebuke from the former “Star Trek” captain.“Kissing is kissing no matter who is doing it,” responded Shatner. “If you think it damages a child to show public affection; you are the one who needs help.” Login/Register With:center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Facebooklast_img read more

Loss of traditional diet poverty causes of diabetes research

first_imgAPTN National NewsDiabetes is a major concern for Aboriginal people.Researchers in Ontario studying why may have discovered a few clues.APTN National News reporter Tina House has this story.last_img

Nova Scotia Treaty Day hit by protest

first_imgAPTN National NewsMi’kmaq protesters slowed traffic along a Nova Scotia highway Wednesday.They want to halt a project to store natural gas in the province. There are environmental concerns and calls for more consultation.The protest is timed with the annual Mi’kmaq Treaty Day celebrations.APTN’s Trina Roache has this story.last_img

Marlene Bird talks about being attacked and her struggle since

first_imgLarissa BurnoufAPTN National NewsIt’s still hard for Marlene Bird to remember exactly what happened to her the night she was attacked and set on fire in Prince Albert last June.She recalls talking to a group of people, mostly men who seemed nice, but she didn’t know any of them.“All of a sudden I don’t know what happened but I started to get hurt, to get hit,” said Bird, 47.  in an interview with APTN National News airing tonight. “I started to get hit on my head. I was trying to get up to see.”She blacked out.When Bird came to in the hospital she didn’t know what happened to her or the extent of her injuries.The back of her head was swollen from the beating and her face lacerated, partially exposed from cuts nearly taking her left eye.She was also set on fire with severe burns waist down. They were so bad doctors had to remove both of her legs.“Why did this have to happen to me?” said Bird. “What did I do so wrong to have this happen to me?”Even though she doesn’t remember the attack, Bird says she is haunted by what happened.“I kept dreaming and having some nightmares waking up just scared and shaking,” she said.Police later arrested and charged Leslie Black who’s scheduled to appear in court again later this month.Prince Albert police said they don’t expect to charge anyone else for the attack on Bird and the details of its investigation will come out in trial.For Bird, adjusting to a life with no legs, and dealing the same addictions that left her homeless, is a constant struggle.She started drinking before she was in the Grade 1 and has lost count of how many foster homes she lived in. She struggles with past sexual and physical abuse and grew up as a product residential schools and an alcoholic home.Bird is a client of the YWCA and receiving addictions counselling, as well as temporary housing.Those helping Bird are struggling to find permanent housing that is wheelchair accessible.lburnouf@aptn.calast_img read more

Big renovations at Iqaluit airport – but who is working on the

first_imgKent Driscoll APTN National News$300-million is being spent renovating the airport in Iqaluit.Part of the deal is that the contractor was supposed to hire a certain percentage of Inuk workers.Is that happening?kdriscoll@aptn.caFollow @kentdriscolllast_img

First Nations students in Thunder Bay raise money towards safe place to

first_imgWillow Fiddler APTN National NewsA safe place for First Nations students to live while attending high school in Thunder Bay has long been a concern.A student residence was a recommendation from a recent inquest looking into the deaths of seven First Nations students in the city.Students there took matters into their own hands recently to finally have that safe place.wfiddler@aptn.calast_img

Most actively traded companies on the TSX

first_imgSome of the most active companies traded Thursday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (15,172.72, up 45.91 points):Cenovus Energy Inc. (TSX:CVE). Oil and gas. Up 13 cents, or 1.18 per cent, to $11.11 on 6.4 million shares.Encana Corp. (TSX:ECA). Oil and gas. Up 31 cents, or 2.50 per cent, to $12.73 on 5.53 million shares.Precision Drilling Corp. (TSX:PD). Oil and gas. Up two cents, or 0.58 per cent, to $3.49 on 5.49 million shares.Crescent Point Energy (TSX:CPG). Oil and gas. Up 37 cents, or 4.18 per cent, to $9.22 on 4.4 million shares.Veresen Inc. (TSX:VSN). Oil and gas. Up six cents, or 0.33 per cent, to $18.03 on 4.2 million shares.Birchcliff Energy Ltd. (TSX:BIR). Oil and gas. Up nine cents, or 1.45 per cent, to $6.28 on 3.8 million shares.Companies reporting major news:Empire Company Ltd. (TSX:EMP.A). Retail. Up $2.88 cents, or 14.48 per cent, to $22.61 on 1.6 million shares. Canada’s second-largest grocery retailer reported it earned $54 million or 20 cents per diluted share on $6.27 billion in sales in the first quarter of its 2018 financial year. That compared with a profit of $65.4 million or 24 cents per share diluted share on nearly $6.19 billion in sales a year earlier. Empire also said it is working to mitigate proposed minimum wage increases on its Ontario and Alberta operations, which could be up to $25 million in its 2018 financial year and $70 million in its 2019 financial year.last_img read more

New local media outlets crop up as traditional community papers close

first_imgTORONTO – Dave Bidini asks “what if” a lot.As in, what if the mainstream press didn’t care about George Clooney building a house on Lake Cuomo? Maybe, just maybe, he says as he sprinkles in a few profanities, communities would be better off.Next month, the prolific musician, author and general man-about-Toronto, will be trudging door to door delivering his most recent creation: a 20-page broadsheet newspaper called the West End Phoenix. It will be a community rag, served without advertisements every month or so, with a focus on a few west-end neighbourhoods.“We used to have a whack of really, really great community papers, but they’re all glorified flyer-mobiles now,” Bidini says, his voice rising.“Goddammit, we’re in Toronto, we’re in this amazing city and we’re in this catchment in the west end where there are so many stories and we need a paper that will focus on the community. And you know what, the lane is wide open for us.”Bidini is betting on the community where he lives to respond. He has budgeted about $300,000 for the first year for eight to 10 issues and says he’s raised about 40 per cent of the funds needed. The money comes from a mixture of what he calls patrons, those who have shelled out $500 to $25,000. Count artists Margaret Atwood, Yann Martel and Serena Ryder among the donors.He says he has about 1,100 subscribers thus far and is hoping for 5,000 within a year. He’s going local.“We, as of a society, have to punch open those front doors and roll open those garages,” Bidini says. “In our times, it’s important for us to better know each other.”There is a paucity of community newspapers in Canada, according to research by a Ryerson University journalism professor. April Lindgren runs the Local News Research Project that puts numbers to the mass extinction of news organizations. Her research has led her to dub the situation across Canada as “local news poverty.”Since 2008, 194 news organizations have closed in Canada, either outright or due to mergers, her research shows. Only 62 new ones have popped up over the same time period. She is continually updating the numbers, she says.“News is becoming a luxury item for a community,” Lindgren says.Someone like Bidini finds himself in the perfect position to launch a newspaper, she says.“You need money, education, background and contacts,” Lindgren says.Bidini can tick off some of those boxes and is using his contacts to find money.“I’m having dinners and coffees with potential patrons trying to shake the trees,” he says.Lindgren points to American research that shows people who live in more affluent communities tend to have more access to more local news than people who live in poorer communities.Yet she’s excited for any new news outlets, especially if it’s local.“Research shows the availability of local news is as important to a well-functioning community as a functioning sewer system, good roads, public health services and good schools,” she says.Nearly 700 kilometres north of Toronto, Jeff Elgie speaks of his burgeoning local news empire from Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. He runs Village Media and his crown jewel is SooToday.com, a digital-only news organization based in the northern Ontario city.They have news sites in four other Ontario cities: North Bay, Barrie, Timmins and Guelph, and they’re expanding. They’ve built their own publishing software that powers their sites and they also license it to other news organizations in Sudbury and Thunder Bay where they take a cut of digital sales, he says.Elgie is bullish on local news. He says on an average weekday, SooToday.com sees about 90,000 hits and 42,000 unique visitors, totalling about 15 million hits a month. This from a community with a population 73,368, according to the 2016 census.He says about 97 per cent of traffic is from local stories.“What we’re just doing is what a community newspaper did 20 years ago,” Elgie says. “It’s not that brilliant, really, we’re just focusing on local.”He says he won’t go anywhere near Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver, but is targeting small- to medium-sized cities with populations from 40,000 people to 200,000. He also targets areas that have their own distinct persona, learning from their struggles in Barrie, Ont.“Barrie seems to act a little differently and in some ways behaves a bit more like (a) commuter community where there is not as much interest in engagement in purely local news, so we struggle there,” he says.Another important factor is the competition. He’s looking for places with a weak media landscape. He points to Guelph as a good example. They had already planned to go in there because it fits the profile, but when the local paper, the Guelph Mercury, closed in early 2016, they raced to enter the market and opened up shop eight days later with two former Mercury reporters in tow.The next experiment is to test an even smaller market: Elliot Lake, Ont., with a population of 10,498.They’ll leverage SooToday’s site since it’s so close and they’re already covering issues like crime and health care. He says he already has commitments from companies to buy ads that have nearly covered the new operations launch costs.Like newspapers of yore, his company is making money off obituaries, which they post for free but make advertisement dollars off of their popularity, and classifieds.“In the Soo, we have more used vehicles than Auto Trader does,” Elgie says.Back in Toronto, Bidini already has a few shoestring budget stories to tell. An old high school friend “who’s done very well” will cover printing costs. There is no rent for the newsroom space because they are considered artists in residence at the Gladstone Hotel.He’s pumped for the first issue, which will feature “massive photos and massive illustrations” to go along with both short and long stories.“We do whatever we want to do,” Bidini says.Then it’s back to the what ifs. What if the West End Phoenix is no different than the scores of news outlets that died?“Who knows, maybe we’ll be that, man,” he says, “but we’re gonna try.”Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version misstated the number of issues the West End Phoenix will publish per year.last_img read more

Eldorado begins talks with Greek government postpones decision to suspend work

first_imgVANCOUVER – Eldorado Gold Corp. is temporarily postponing its decision to suspend work at its operations in northern Greece as it begins talks with the Greek government.The company (TSX:ELD) has been embroiled in a fight with the Greek government over its gold mining operations in the country.Eldorado accused the government of delaying key permits and licenses and threatened last week to suspend investment.Since then, the government has issued several permits and approved a key technical study for the closure of an old mine.It also served formal notice that it would initiate an arbitration hearing regarding the company’s Madem Lakkos metallurgical plant.Eldorado chief executive George Burns says the company is “confident” that the arbitration process will be concluded in a timely and efficient manner.The decision came as about 200 company workers protested outside the Development Ministry in Athens, demanding the government ensure Eldorado continues operating.The workers gathered outside the ministry building during the morning rush hour Thursday, banging their hard hats on the road and holding banners saying “Yes to Development.”— With files from The Associated Presslast_img read more

Joan Walsh announces move to CNN after being dumped by MSNBC

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – Political analyst Joan Walsh announced on Saturday that she would be moving to CNN next year after MSNBC said it had decided not to renew her contract as a paid contributor, a decision that has caused an uproar on social media.“I am overwhelmed by the support I’ve received today from all of you. And I’m thrilled to tell you I’ll be heading to CNN in the new year,” Walsh tweeted. “Thanks to everyone who made this happen. A Christmas miracle.”Earlier, Walsh had said on Twitter that she had learned of the New York-based network’s decision Friday while baking pies with her daughter. Her followers have expressed their dismay with the trending #KeepJoanWalsh tag.MSNBC says the paid-contributor list is reviewed annually. It says while Walsh’s contract wasn’t renewed she’s “a key voice” who’s “absolutely still welcome” and would be invited to appear on shows.Walsh says she’s proud of the work she did. She tweets she’s given her “heart and soul to the network,” from the George W. Bush years through today.MSNBC hosts Chris Hayes and Joy Reid have tweeted in support of Walsh.last_img read more

McConnell looks to complete hemps comeback as crop

first_imgFRANKFORT, Ky. – Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wants a full pardon for hemp.The Kentucky Republican on Monday previewed legislation seeking to free the plant from its ties to marijuana and let it take root as a legitimate crop.Hemp — marijuana’s non-intoxicating cousin — would be removed from the controlled substances list under the bill he’s offering, McConnell said. The result would legalize hemp as an agricultural commodity.“We’re going to give it everything we’ve got to pull it off,” the Senate’s top leader told hemp advocates in his home state.The crop has been grown on an experimental basis in a number of states in recent years, and Kentucky has been at the forefront of hemp’s comeback. Kentucky agriculture officials have approved more than 12,000 acres (4,800 hectares) to be grown in the state this year, and 57 Kentucky processors are helping turn the raw product into a multitude of products.Growing hemp without a federal permit has long been banned owing to its classification as a controlled substance related to marijuana. Hemp and marijuana are the same species, but hemp has a negligible amount of THC, the psychoactive compound that gives marijuana users a high.Hemp got a limited reprieve with the 2014 federal Farm Bill. McConnell helped push for the provision that allows state agriculture departments to designate hemp projects for research and development.Since then, 34 states have authorized hemp research, while actual production occurred in 19 states last year, said Eric Steenstra, president of the advocacy group Vote Hemp. Hemp production totalled about 25,500 acres (10,300 hectares) in 2017, more than double the 2016 output, he said.Supporters said the bill would bring more certainty for farmers, agribusinesses and investors looking at the crop.“The goal of this new bill, should it become law, is to simply remove the roadblocks altogether,” McConnell said. “It would encourage innovation and development and support to domestic production of hemp.”The crop, which once thrived in Kentucky, was historically used for rope, clothing and mulch from the fiber, hemp milk and cooking oil from the seeds, and soap and lotions. Other uses include building materials, animal bedding and biofuels.Hemp advocates, who have fought for years to restore the crop’s legitimacy, praised McConnell for putting his political clout behind the effort.“This is a huge development for the hemp industry,” Steenstra said. “Sen. McConnell’s support is critical to helping us move hemp from research and pilot programs to full commercial production.”Brian Furnish, an eighth-generation tobacco farmer in Kentucky, has taken the plunge into hemp production. His family will grow about 300 acres (120 hectares) of hemp this year in Harrison County. He’s also part owner of a company that turns hemp into food, fiber and dietary supplements.Furnish said hemp has the potential to rival or surpass what tobacco production once meant to Kentucky.“All we’ve got to do is the government get out of the way and let us grow,” he told reporters.McConnell acknowledged there was “some queasiness” about hemp in 2014 when federal lawmakers cleared the way for states to regulate it for research and pilot programs. There’s much broader understanding now that hemp is a “totally different” plant than its cousin, he said.“I think we’ve worked our way through the education process of making sure everybody understands this is really a different plant,” the Republican leader said.McConnell said he plans to emphasize the differences between the plants to Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The Trump administration has taken a tougher stance on marijuana.The Department of Justice’s press office declined comment Monday on McConnell’s pending legislation.McConnell said his bill would attract a bipartisan group of co-sponsors. He said the measure would allow states to have primary regulatory oversight of hemp production if they submit plans to federal officials outlining how they would monitor production.In Kentucky, current or ex-tobacco farmers could easily make the conversion to hemp production, Furnish said. Tobacco production dropped sharply in Kentucky as the health hazards of smoking became clear and tobacco use declined.Furnish said his family has reaped profits of about $2,000 per acre for hemp grown for dietary supplements, better than what they’ve made from tobacco, he said.Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said he hopes for hemp’s legalization, saying it can “open the floodgates and we can see the true potential of this crop.”last_img read more

The NB retiree whose borderbeer battle could change Confederation

first_imgFREDERICTON – A New Brunswick retiree who just wanted to buy cheaper suds is about to find out if his 2012 beer run to Quebec will change the nature of Confederation.The Supreme Court of Canada is to make a key ruling Thursday on interprovincial trade, in a case that began when Gerard Comeau was stopped by police with 14 cases of beer and three bottles of liquor in his trunk.“I’m a Canadian citizen. I can go and shop wherever I want. You can buy clothes, shoes, jewellery, everything and bring it over. How come beer is limited?” Comeau said Wednesday from his home in Tracadie, a small community in the northeast of the province.The low-key, 64-year-old retired NB Power linesman was fined nearly $300.But a New Brunswick trial judge ruled that the charge violated constitutional law, overturning a ban on bringing alcohol across provincial boundaries.It quickly became a test case with wide implications.Comeau’s lawyer has said the ruling could have the power to shift a host of laws across the country governing everything from selling chickens to how engineers and other professionals work across provincial lines. Some trade experts have said a Comeau victory could trigger lawsuits across the country seeking to dismantle similar government-run corporations for cannabis.Many provinces have intervened in the case against Comeau, while a team of lawyers with an interest in the constitutional issues offered to represent him for free, and the Canadian Constitution Foundation volunteered its assistance.He said he never would have been able to afford the legal fight without the help.“Any of these big cases they’ll drag it and drag it until you’re out of money and have to give up,” he said.At issue is a section of the New Brunswick Liquor Control Act prohibiting anyone in the province from having more than 12 pints of beer not purchased through a liquor store in the province.The trial judge said the law is at odds with Section 121 of the Constitution Act, which reads “All articles of the growth, produce, or manufacture of any one of the provinces shall, from and after the union, be admitted free into each of the other provinces.”Judge Ronald LeBlanc said the original framers of the Constitution never intended that laws should blatantly block the free flow of goods within their new country.During that trial, a senior vice-president of the New Brunswick Liquor Corp., said Quebec prices are cheaper because the producers deal directly with the retailers and the government doesn’t add a mark-up.He said in New Brunswick, where the sale of liquor must be through NB Liquor outlets, the corporation adds a mark-up of as much as 89.8 per cent.The New Brunswick government has argued that the case threatens to end Canadian federalism as it was originally conceived. But Comeau said his interest is more personal.“I want to know about me as an individual. Can I go and buy whatever I want, wherever I want and take it home? It’s a simple question. That’s what I want to know,” he said.Comeau said he continues to buy cheaper beer in Quebec — as recently as last weekend.“It doesn’t change my life much. I’m still Gerard Comeau,” he said laughing.Comeau is also hoping to finally be reimbursed for the trunkload of alcohol that was seized more than five years ago.last_img read more

Nova Chemicals appeals ruling that it pay Dow US106billion in damages

first_imgCALGARY – Nova Chemicals has appealed an Alberta judge’s order that it pay US$1.06 billion in damages to Dow Chemical Canada in a dispute over a massive ethylene plant in the province.The dispute centres on a production facility in Joffre, Alta. known as E3 that Nova started operating in 2000.Dow Canada alleged breach of contract over the E3 joint venture agreements, claimed that Nova took part of the ethylene and other products that belonged to Dow and failed to run the facility at full production.Nova said it faced an ethane shortage and ran the facility as fully as it could, subject to mechanical issues that constrained production.Justice Barbara Romaine of the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench ruled in favour of Dow in June, and against a counterclaim filed by Nova in a case that included claims and counterclaims for damages between 2001 to 2012.Nova Chemicals says in its appeal that the trial judge “fundamentally misapprehended” the project agreements, including the context they were entered into, and so mistakenly awarded the damages.(Companies in this story: TSX:NCX)last_img read more

Instacart to expand Toronto office into tech hub hire 200 people

first_imgCanada’s major grocery chains looking to boost their e-commerce offerings to stave off the impact of Amazon’s entrance into the crowded industry are partnering with companies to give shoppers the option of home delivery.Companies offering a range of home delivery solutions are now expanding across Canada, building robotics-filled warehouses, adding hundreds of jobs and hoping to prove their method is the best at serving a vast country with a relatively small population.“There’s no shortage of headlines. Every day, there’s a new company making a new announcement,” said Sarah Joyce, senior vice-president of e-commerce at Sobeys Inc., who has been in the newly created position for about three months.Instacart, a California-based online grocery app company founded by a Canadian, announced Tuesday it will transform its Toronto office into a tech hub and add 200 employees over the next several years. The office is set to open sometime next year and will be the company’s second location to focus on research and development, with the first in San Francisco.Last week, Food-X Urban Delivery Inc., a subsidiary of Vancouver-based Spud, announced it partnered with Walmart Canada to deliver groceries to customers in the Vancouver area. The big box store is Food-X’s first major partner for its new warehouse designed to reduce the environmental impact of delivering groceries by reducing food waste and minimizing truck trips.Sobeys, for its part, revealed earlier this year a partnership with the British Ocado Group to build a customer fulfillment centre in the Toronto area filled with robotics that can pick and pack customer orders. The centre will start delivering customer orders in the spring of 2020.The influx of announcements came after Amazon acquired Whole Foods Market, which now has 14 Canadian locations, last year. The move sparked speculation the company would bring its checkout-free store concept and AmazonFresh grocery delivery service to Canada.That pushed the country’s major grocers to introduce or ramp up delivery services of their own, with many choosing to partner with companies already operating in this niche rather than build expensive in-house services.“That says a lot about where we are at as an industry and about this new era of strategic partnerships,” said Daryl Porter, vice-president of omni-channel operations and online grocery at Walmart.The company has opted for two different partners in different cities, a conscious decision that Porter said comes down to what value proposition providers offer customers.Walmart’s participating in a one-hour delivery pilot with Instacart in Toronto and soon-to-be in Winnipeg. Meanwhile, in Vancouver, it opted for a next-day delivery method with Food-X.“This is models, right,” said Peter van Stalk, Food-X founder.He’s convinced the company’s strategy, which includes people picking the food items to fulfil orders and focuses on reducing the environmental impact, can win more big-name partners. Food-X’s technology can withstand Canada’s cold winters, he added, and can service low density areas.But Sobeys believes it’s better to wait a little longer to launch, but offer a mostly automated experience.Sobeys anticipates having up to four such warehouses in the country, which could cover about 75 per cent of Canadian households.Both Joyce and van Stalk admit their models don’t offer one-hour delivery, but could do that or close to it in the future.Quick delivery windows are Instacart’s advantage and the company’s partnered with Walmart and Loblaw to offer one-hour timeframes already.“(Customers) don’t want to plan too far ahead for when they’re going to have their groceries delivered,” said Nilam Ganenthiran, Instacart’s chief business officer.Before Instacart, “groceries really lagged the rest of e-commerce,” he said, but “the magic of Instacart” allowed people to open their fridge door, see what’s missing and order online rather than rush to the store.It’s unclear which model will dominate Canada’s online grocery industry, but for now retailers seem content to leverage the experience of the niche operators.“We can learn from them,” said Walmart’s Porter, “and we are learning from them.”Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.Companies in this story (TSX:EMP.A) (TSX:L)last_img read more

CAPP calls for the feds for longterm answers for oil price differential

first_imgCALGARY (660 NEWS) – The Prime Minister and the Federal Finance Minister both made an appearance in Calgary within the last seven days and they were both met with protesters because of the financial crisis involving record low oil prices.Now the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) is calling out the government to act in order to solve the problem.President and CEO, Tim McMillan, said the industry in a tough spot right now.“In the short-term, there are very few good options.”He called the increase in rail movement a medium-term answer that won’t cut to the heart of the problem.“In the short-term rail is already ramping up, but it is going to be insufficient for quite some time. The ultimate solution is getting more pipelines built.”He believes this government’s record has resulted in many of the problems for the industry, and therefore Alberta is facing today.“I think that the federal government should be acknowledging that the results of cancelling Northern Gateway and difficulties of getting other projects moved forward has created this and no one should be surprised we are in this situation.”He noted the industry is not looking for any kind of bailout from any government.“We are a free-enterprise industry that rarely looks to the government for support. We look for them to enable us to invest and grow the Canadian economy.”McMillan also believes the protests we saw in Calgary were a sign that people want action, but he did say it was a positive sign that leaders in the country were willing to listen to the concerns that many people in Alberta have.“I would also expect that after they have listened and acknowledged the crisis, that they would take the actions appropriate. We have been very frustrated about their approach to Bill C-69 and their approach to pipelines in general.”That bill, as it stands, would mean there would be more consultation. McMillan believes that would be a death blow to future projects in the country.“No new pipelines projects will go forward in Canada if this bill passes.” Will the pro-pipeline rallies held during the Prime Minister’s and Finance Minister’s visits to Calgary sway federal government policy on energy?Yes, quite a bitMaybe a little bitNo, not at allVoteView Results Take Our Polllast_img read more

Surerus and Macro joint ventures selected by TransCanada to build Coastal GasLink

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – TransCanada Corp. announced today that it has conditionally awarded contracts to the Surerus Murphy and Macro Spiecapag joint ventures, as well as SA Energy Group and Pacific Atlantic Pipeline Construction Inc. to build the proposed Coastal GasLink Pipeline.TransCanada said that the contracts are conditional pending a positive final investment decision by LNG Canada to build a proposed LNG export terminal in Kitimat. TransCanada said that the cumulative value of the four contracts will total approximately $2.8 billion.“The selection of our construction team is an important milestone for the Coastal GasLink project,” said Coastal GasLink Pipeline Project president Rick Gateman. “The project will create significant employment opportunities for Indigenous communities in northern B.C. as well as local skilled labourers and businesses. Our pipeline, connecting prolific Northeast B.C. gas to high value, international end-use markets via the LNG Canada liquefaction facility in Kitimat, will allow British Columbians and Canadians alike the opportunity to more effectively benefit from the responsible development of our valuable natural gas resources.”The four contractors will be directly responsible for hiring a projected 2,500 workers over the four-year construction period, and TransCanada said there will be a special emphasis placed on hiring locally first, giving priority to qualified local and Indigenous businesses in northern B.C. To date, Coastal GasLink has spent approximately $60 million locally in northern B.C., including over $3 million on community investment initiatives, education and skills training initiatives.last_img read more

School District 60 looks at making upgrades to lighting

first_imgBefore signing any documentation with Radiance, the District was seeking support from the Board to move forward with the project.The Board voted in favour to receive more information before signing documentation and making the upgrades to the lighting. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – At a special School District 60 board meeting on Monday, Trustees looked into the matter of upgrading lights at all School District facilities.According to School District Secretary-Treasurer, Brenda Hooker, they have been in discussions with Radiance Energy for the past six months regarding an LED lighting upgrade to all facilities.Hooker says other Districts have been working with Radiance to upgrade lights and say the new lighting bring benefits such as improving the classroom environment and lowering hydro costs when compared to the standard fluorescent lighting.last_img read more

Gold imports dip 5.5% to $29.5 bn during April-Feb

first_imgNew Delhi: The country’s gold imports dipped about 5.5 per cent in value terms to $29.5 billion during April-February 2018-19, which is expected to keep a lid on the current account deficit. Total imports of the precious metal in the corresponding period of 2017-18 stood at $31.2 billion, according to commerce ministry data. Trade experts said softening prices of the yellow metal in the world markets could be the reason for the contraction in imports. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalAfter recording negative growth for three consecutive months — October, November and December 2018, gold imports grew by 38.16 per cent to $2.31 billion in January this year. It again contracted by 10.8 per cent to $2.58 billion in February. India is one of the largest gold importers in the world, and the imports mainly take care of demand from the jewellery industry. Gems and jewellery exports too dipped by 6.3 per cent to $28.5 billion during the 11 months of the current fiscal. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostIndia’s current account deficit (CAD), or the difference between outflow and inflow of foreign exchange in the current account, widened to 2.9 per cent of the GDP in the second quarter of the fiscal, against 1.1 per cent in the year-ago period, mainly due to a large trade deficit. In volume terms, the country’s total gold imports increased by 22.43 per cent to 955.16 tonnes in 2017-18. It stood at 780.14 tonnes in 2016-17. The government has introduced several measures to restrict the import of gold, including restricting duty-free gold imports from South Korea as allowed under the India-Korea free trade agreement and imposition of self-use condition on Premier Trading House/Star Trading House authorised to import the precious metal directly from overseas bullion suppliers. It has also imposed 10 per cent import duty on gold. The domestic jewellery industry always demands a cut in the duty and relaxation of norms for increasing availability of the yellow metal to boost jewellery exports.last_img read more

NGT raps Delhi pollution control panel over air quality

first_imgNew Delhi: The National Green Tribunal has rapped the Delhi Pollution Control Committee (DPCC) over its failure to control air pollution in the national capital, saying it was avoiding its duties. A bench, headed by NGT Chairperson Justice Adarsh Kumar Goel, directed the Delhi chief secretary to look into the matter and take remedial measures about proper manning and effective functioning of the DPCC. “The tribunal may have to consider whether a statutory authority which is repeatedly failing to perform its duties should continue in position as one of the reasons which is contributing to unabated pollution in Delhi resulting in large scale deaths and diseases is the failure of statutory authorities to perform their duties. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murder “In absence of responsiveness of the statutory authorities who have to carry out the orders of this tribunal, mere passing of paper orders will not advance the purpose for which this tribunal has been constituted under the law,” the bench said. It said that no officer or authority can be allowed to defeat law in the manner it is being done on regular basis by the DPCC. The tribunal said that in such a situation, option may also have to be explored for action under Section 18(2) of the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974, whereby the central government may handover the functions of defiant DPCC to the Central Pollution Control Board. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchings “Before further action, we direct the Chief Secretary, Delhi to look into the matter and take remedial measures about proper manning and effective functioning of the DPCC. The DPCC may file a proper affidavit of the action taken in the matter before the next date,” the bench said. The tribunal was hearing a plea filed by city resident Rajesh Kumar alleging air pollution by a brake lining factory near Chajju Gate, Babarpur here. The NGT had earlier directed DPCC to furnish a factual and action taken report. “A report has been received vide e-mail dated March 29 to the effect that East Delhi Municipal Corporation has sealed the premises and the SHO (Welcome) will be keeping strict vigil. “The report does not show any steps for prosecution or recovery of compensation for damage to the environment on ‘Polluter Pays principle’,” the tribunal noted.last_img read more

RJD releases manifesto, promises reservation

first_imgPatna: The RJD on Monday released its manifesto, titled ‘Pratibadhta Patra’, promising reservation for SCs, STs, EBC and OBCs in proportion of their population in the private sector and the higher judiciary. The ceiling – a 50 per cent cap – had been broken after giving 10 per cent quota to the weaker sections among the general category so the people belonging to these categories (SCs, STs, EBC and OBCs) should be given reservation on the basis of their population, party leader Tejashwi Yadav said while releasing the manifesto here. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ The apex court had fixed a cap of 50 per cent on total reservation and the Centre last month justified in Supreme Court its recent law granting 10-per cent quota for Economically Weaker Sections (EWSs), saying it was brought in to promote “social equality”. Advocating extension of quota for them in higher judiciary and the private sector, the manifesto also vowed to carry out caste-based census in 2020-21. Pointing out that the RJD, also agrees with the Congress manifesto, it said, the party “completely endorses” the ‘Nyay’ scheme of the Congress, which would be beneficial to states like Bihar. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K Tejashwi Yadav was accompanied by Rajya Sabha member and party’s national spokesman Manoj Jha, Bihar RJD chief Ram Chandra Purve and others at the release of the party’s manifesto. The RJD also demanded from the Centre to make public the Socio Economic Caste Census (SECC) data, carried out by the UPA government. Releasing the manifesto, Tejashwi Prasad Yadav, also the leader of the opposition in the state, said that “it is not the manifesto of RJD, rather it is a ‘pratibadhta patra’ (commitment document) of the party”. A helpline number would be launched and a help centre set up in major cities of the country for the people of Bihar living outside the state, the manifesto said. The party would ensure that six per cent of gross domestic product be spent on education and four per cent on health, he said. “If our (party’s) government is formed in Bihar, then we will remove the ‘illegal’ tag on toddy and make it ‘legal’….The move to make toddy illegal has rendered many belonging to economically weaker sections jobless. “My father Lalu Prasad, when he was the chief minister, had abolished tax on toddy,” the RJD leader said. Replying to a query on his elder brother Tej Pratap Yadav’s recent activities, Tejashwi evaded a direct reply, saying “the press conference has been organized for releasing the manifesto today”. According to the seat-sharing formula for the 40 Lok Sabha seats in Bihar announced by the opposition ‘Mahagathbandhan’, 20 seats will be fought by the RJD and nine by the Congress. Of the 20 constituencies, the RJD has left the Ara seat to the CPI(ML) Liberation. Upendra Kushwaha’s Rashtriya Lok Samta Party (RLSP) and Mukesh Sahni’s Vikasheel Insan Party (VIP) will field candidates on five and three seats respectively. Former chief minister Jitan Ram Manjhi’s Hindustan Awam Morcha (HAM) has been given three seats. The seven-phase election in Bihar is scheduled from April 11 to May 19.last_img read more